Why is One Breast Softer Than the Other 1 Week Post-op?

Feb.18, 2011 I had my surgery. I suffered slight asemmetry, as well as minimal drooping due to one child. I had 450 cc left breast 470 cc right breast saline unders placed. My left side, which was the bigger side beforehand is dropping faster and softer than my right side. I've started post op massage, as well as living in the compression belt. How can I get ol' righty to catch up? Also, why do my deltoids burn? Is it nerves regenerating as well? Thank you

Doctor Answers (19)

Breast Implant Healing

+2

One week after surgery is too early to start getting nervous.  It is not unusual for there to be slight asymmetry as the breasts heal.  Keep doing the exercises and banding that your doctor instructed and you should see positive improvement soon.

 

Good Luck.


New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Breast Asymmetry after Breast Augment

+2

Most patients see a little asymmetry in the first few weeks after breast augment. It can be due to differences in the degree of swelling as well as differences that existed before surgery.

Give it a few weeks to settle down before you get overly anxious. Good Luck!

Mark Preston, MD
Columbus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Breast implant asymmetry

+1

Thank you for the question.

Some  degree of breast asymmetry  is to be expected after breast augmentation surgery,  especially on the 7th post op day. Sometimes implants may take several months and up to a year to “drop”.  I have found this to be especially true when work has been done on the lower pole of the breasts and/or when larger breast implants are used.

I would suggest continued patient,  nonaccusatory  follow-up with your plastic surgeon.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 681 reviews

You might also like...

Asymmetry after surgery

+1

There may be a variety of reasons why one breast is firmer than the other one week after surgery. One breast may have swelled more and this may be of no consequence. However, there are medical conditions following the procedure that could cause this that may not resolve on their own accord. I would make your surgeon aware of the issue and schedule a postoperative appointment.

Marc Schneider, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Assymetrical Henaling After a Breast Augmentation

+1
It is pretty typical for our bodies to heal at an un even pace. You had some assymentry before your surgery so it is not surprising that you are finding some afterwards. I would make sure to go to all of your follow up appointments and make sure your Plastic Suregon agrees. Best of Luck!

Miguel Delgado, Jr., MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Healing periods are often different on each breast.

+1

You just have to be patient and give your breasts time to heal.  Since you had asymmetry, more work was done to correct your breasts.  Healing times are not equal on the right and left breast.  The burning you are feeling is typical in healing.  It may be nerves healing.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Experience one week after your surgery

+1

You are only one week after surgery.  You are likely swollen and swelling/edema can commonly before more on one side than the other.  Depending on what was done in your surgery, you will need to give at least 3-6 weeks to allow your swelling to resolve so you can better evaluate/assess your results.  Don't forget to follow the postoperative care plan recommended by your surgeon.  Best of luck.

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 113 reviews

Asymmetry after breast surgery

+1

After a little more than one week since your surgery it is common to have a little asymmetry. Some of this may be related to the surgery, though most of this is due to your pre-surgical appearance. If you start with asymmetry of your breasts before surgery you will most likely have asymmetry after surgery. Having an augmentation alone does not allow the surgeon to make changes to the shape of your breasts - only the volume. Also, it is very early to judge the end results. I would recommend that you wait at least three months from your surgery. If you are not happy in the end, you can always choose to have another procedure to reshape your breasts in the future.

I hope this info helps!

Adam Rubinstein, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Post Op Breast Asymmetry

+1

It is quite common to have post op asymmetry after breast augmentation especially if you has preop asymmetry .   There is such thing as perfectly symmetrical breasts since we studied this several years ago in a study published in PRS .  Over 85% of females have some type of breast asymmetry.  If the asymmetry is minor, one does not need to use different size implants.  However,  if significant, you adjust the size accordingly with ease especially using saline implants which allow for a variable amonunt of implant volume filling.

Most breast asymmetry resolves in the first 3-4 weeks along with breast massages and normal wound healing .

Rod J. Rohrich, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Asymmetry Post Breast Augmentation

+1

I believe your left breast is softer and dropping more because you have a larger skin envelope on this side.    On the right side, there is less skin, therefore the implant feels tighter and harder.  I would allow 4-6 weeks for the swelling to resolve and assess your implant final position.    Close followup with your plastic surgeon is essential to monitor your progress and ensure that you do not have a complication, such as a fluid collection or scar formation.

I wish you a safe and healthy recovery.

Paul S. Gill, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.