​Can I make my right eye symmetrical with my left eye?

I've always noticed the right eye always looked different from my left eye. My right eye is more closed. I really want my right eye (in the picture) to look the same as my left eye. Is there any surgery I can do. I think it is caused due to my right brow sagging more than my left brow. Thank you.

Doctor Answers 2

Eye asymmetry

You should obtain an in person evaluation by an oculoplastic surgeon. It appears the smaller eye is more sunken than the other (or the other eye is more bulgy). This is likely congenital in your case resulting from underlying bony facial asymmetry.

Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

Perhaps you are right.

However, when I look closely at the photo, it appears that there is upper eyelid retraction which is more evident on the right side.  Upper eyelid retraction could cause the brow to fall accounting for what you have noticed.  Perhaps you have always looked like this.  It is worth reviewing photographs of yourself to determine when this change started.  The most common cause of this type of situation is Grave's Disease, an autoimmune disease that causes an overactive thyroid and changes to the eyelids and orbit.  Your primary care physician can do testing to see if your thyroid is normal.  A careful assessment by an oculoplastic surgeon is warranted.  Generally ophthalmologists an optometrists are not equipped to provide this specialized assessment.  The American Society for Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons maintains a region directory on their website (ASOPRS dot org) that can help you find a well qualified surgeon.  Yes, there are surgeries that can be performed to increase symmetry.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.