Is quitting smoking 14 days prior to mommy makeover enough time to reduce risks?

I am scheduled for a mommy makeover ( breast lift and augmentation and tummy tuck with lipo) in 2 weeks, 13 days to be exact. I have been about a half a pack a day smoker for 11 years. Is 14 days enough time to quit before my procedure?

Doctor Answers 19

Is quitting smoking 14 days prior to mommy makeover enough time to reduce risks?

Hello! Thank you for your question! The issue with nicotine is that it also acts as a vasoconstrictor, clamping down of blood vessels. Blood supply is always of great concern during any surgical procedure, but especially in such a procedure as a mastopexy and ummy tuck where the viability of the nipple-areolar complex as well as skin/tissue and belly button is obviously important. Since the vascularity to the area is already tenuous since it will be raised by cutting around the area, maximizing blood flow to the tissue is critical.

Typically, we recommend at least 6 weeks of smoking cessation prior to and at least 6 weeks after any surgical procedure. The longer, the better. Nicotine always increases the risk for infection, nipple necrosis, poor scarring, and wound complications, as well as other health consequences including blood clots. The anesthesia risk is greater with general anesthesia as well as pulmonary issues/lung infections postoperatively. I would discuss this with your surgeon prior to your procedure. Hope that this helps! Best wishes!


Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Quitting smoking 2 weeks before mommy makeover, enough time?

Smoking brings a significant risk of cancer, stroke, heat attack, etc. From a Plastic Surgery standpoint it is a vasoconstrictor. Wound healing is all about getting oxygen and needed entities to the wound. It is well known that patient who smoke have a tremendous increase in their rate of serious complications, (infections, wounds falling apart, etc.). Nicotine is the main vasoconstrictor, so getting a patch or lozenge of nicotine won't help the vasoconstriction. Best to be off the tobacco/nicotine entirely before surgery. Please be honest with your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon. Together you can make a plan to quit and proceed with surgery. The amount of time between quitting and surgery will depend on the Plastic Surgeon and the procedure.

Jeffrey J. Roth, MD, FACS
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Smoking and surgery

Here are the major points of smoking Tobacco or Marijuana before or after surgery:
1. There is nicotine in tobacco, but not in marijuana. However, most joints are rolled with marijuana and tobacco combination. Nicotine is a vasoconstrictor that decreases blood flow to the tissues. This is the major problems that can cause a very bad outcome in some surgeries. In a breast augmentation, there is not a lot of risk as there are not a lot of incisions which decrease blood flow to the tissues. In a breast lift or tummy tuck, on the other hand, there is much longer and more involved incisions. The decrease in blood flow to the tissues in combination with the decrease in blood flow from the nicotine can cause tissue to die. This can cause part of the breast or nipple, or in the case of a tummy tuck, part of the belly tissue to die, resulting in a very bad outcome. This is especially bad in breast reductions or face lifts. Your skin and tissue can turn black and fall off if this happens. Marijuana without tobacco does not cause this problem, or marijuana in an edible fashion. Vaporizers do not decrease the amount of nicotine in tobacco, only decrease the smoke. Hookah also does not decrease nicotine.
2. There is carbon monoxide in both tobacco smoke and marijuana smoke. Carbon monoxide decreases the oxygen carrying capacity of hemoglobin in the blood. This is different from the vasoconstrictor effect, but has the same result of having the risk of tissue death in conjunction with surgeries that decrease the blood flow to tissues such as breast lifts and tummy tucks, as opposed to an augmentation alone that does not decrease blood flow to as great of an extent. Again, edible forms of marijuana do not have smoke, and thus carbon monoxide poisoning.
3. Coughing. Both tobacco and marijuana smoke disrupt the lining of the lungs and bronchi and can lead to coughing episodes. Coughing episodes can lead to internal bleeding after surgery that can lead to hematomas and complications, and again a bad outcome. Again, edible forms of marijuana does not have this effect.
4. Anesthesia effects. Marijuana can have drug interactions with certain anesthetic drugs. Thus it is important to tell your anesthesiologist about your marijuana use.
In conclusion, Smoking, whether it be tobacco or marijuana, is detrimental to your surgery outcome. Edible marijuana is much less so, but be honest about your use with your surgeon and anesthesiologist so that you can have the best outcome. In general, you should quite smoking many weeks, ideally 6 weeks before surgery, and not smoke for at least 2 weeks after surgery.
Best wishes,
Pablo Prichard, MD

Pablo Prichard, MD
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 42 reviews

How long should I quit smoking before mom a mommy makeover?

It is well known that smoking diminishes the blood supply to the skin.  It is for this reason that smoking preoperatively can lead to significant wound healing problems and possible loss of skin.  Many surgeons recommend stopping smoking for 6 weeks before in 4 weeks after.  This will significantly diminished your risk for wound healing problems.  It is probably safe to say however that you will still be at a risk higher than someone who is never smoked before.  Considering the time in the expense that you are investing in this procedure it is best for you to do all

John J. Edney, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 108 reviews

Smoking

Smoking increases the risks of many complications during and after surgery. It is reccomendded that patients stop smoking atleast one month prior to surgery. The longer you stop, the better.

Orlando Llorente, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 156 reviews

Stop smoking before surgery

If you have been a smoker for many years, even stopping smoking 14 days before surgery does not completely eliminate the risk that smoking causes. The risk that smoking causes is a reduced blood supply to the skin, particularly of the tummy and can result in skin loss, which in turn can be a difficult complication. Some doctors believe 14 days is enough, and others will go even further than that and suggest 6 weeks of completely stopping smoking before surgery. That is a topic best addressed with your board-certified plastic surgeon to see what their stance is. Hope this helps!

Joseph Hunstad, MD
Charlotte Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Quit smoking at least one month prior to surgery

Smokers have more problems even if they quit smoking but of course quitting helps minimize some problems.  You really need to quit smoking for one month before and one months after surgery.   Your small blood vessels will do better from a months rest from the bad effects of nicotine.  If you cease smoking for one month your lungs  will be clearer and coughing less.  My Best,  Dr C

Smoking and Mommy Makover

My typical recommendation when a patient is undergoing a tummy tuck and breast lift and augmentation is to quit smoking 2-3 months prior to your surgery date. 

No nicotine 2 weeks before mommy makeover

We require our patients to have quit smoking 2 weeks before a tummy tuck, breast lift, or facelift because of the specific risks of healing associated with nicotine exposure. Keep in mind that you haven't really quit until whatever withdrawal symptoms you will have are over as well; until then it is just good intentions.

Richard Baxter, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Smoking and Mommy Makeover surgery

Congratulations on kicking the habit.  Despite your efforts to be tobacco free before surgery, your long history of tobacco use puts you at higher risk for slow or delayed healing.  The best thing for you to do is to stay away from this cigarettes (And this includes second hand smoke).   Please talk to your PS about his/her specific recommendations.  Best wishes for a speedy recovery.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.