Tummy tuck dehiscence? (Photo)

I am 4 weeks post op from full tummy tuck. I have a wound separation on my right pelvic area that starting about 1.5 week post op. I have been following up with my PS every 2 weeks (I go again tomorrow) but he says it looks pretty normal and is only a minor complication. I feel like it is never going to heal but I have seen pictures of other separations that look very deep. Is this only minor since it seems to be staying right at the surface? How many weeks can I expect it to be like this?

Doctor Answers 9

Tummy tuck dehiscence?

I am sorry to hear about the complication you are experiencing. These types of complications can be quite distressing to patients; unfortunately, sometimes the wounds do look worse before they begin to look better.
Close follow up with your plastic surgeon will be in your best interests; sometimes removal of a exposed suture and/or removal of any unhealthy tissue will expedite healing.

Wound care regimens will differ from one plastic surgeon to another. Generally, this will involve application of some type of sterile dressing ( in my practice I use a non-stick dressing covered by a sterile dressing). You should have peace of mind that these types of wound healing problems generally go on to heal over the course of the next several weeks, often without long-term sequelae. Also important to concentrate on a healthy diet, including good protein source. Sometimes (depending on the width of the open wound and the appearance of the scar in the longer term), scar revision surgery may be helpful down the line. Best wishes.

Tummy Tuck Dehiscence

Thank you very much for your picture.

It is not uncommon to have a small dehiscence of the suture line after a tummy tuck.  With good wound care (which your plastic surgeon will help guide), you should heal up just fine in a few weeks.  If the scar continues to be thickened, then there are scar treatments that may help, or ultimately a scar revision.  The end result should be great.  Hang in there!

Daniel Krochmal, MD
Chicago General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Wound seperation

It is not uncommon to have the skin separate after after tummy tuck. It may take 4-6 weeks for the area to heal in.

Deborah Sillins, MD
Cincinnati Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Tummy tuck dehiscence?

Upto 8 weeks would be my guess!>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Wound healing issues

 I'm sorry you have experienced this minor setback of what looks to be a very superficial wound separation. Incisions in different locations heal at different rates in different people so it's impossible project how quickly this will heal for you. By keeping the wound clean and in a moist environment, in my experience, will allow for the fastest healing of this small separation. Keep in touch with your plastic surgeon and follow their advice. Good luck.

Marc J. Salzman, MD, FACS
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Open incision 6 weeks PO. What can be done? (Photo)

Thank you for your question and photo. I am so sorry that your healing experience has been troubled. Your #wound does not appear severe. By following your #BCPS, you will move toward healing as you clean and dress it daily, as your PS recommends. I suggest that you make sure that protein is a regular part of your daily diet plan. #Protein aids in healing. Be patient and best wishes!

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 96 reviews

Tummy tuck dehiscence or wound separation

Thank you for your question. It looks like you have a minor wound separation by the picture you've sent. I'm not sure if this is an actual dehiscence since it does not look like a full separation of the entire abdominal wall. With minor separations like this it is best to just continue close follow-up with your surgeon and wait for final epithelialization, or covering of the wound with skin. Only after complete resolution of the wound has occurred can we entertain a revision, if it is deemed necessary. Don't drive yourself nuts with looking at others' pictures because every surgery and every body is different. Hope this helps. Good luck and farewell. 

Tummy tuck dehiscence?

Thank you for your question and the photo. I'm sorry that you are having difficulty after your procedure. Based on your photo, I agree that your dehiscence appears superficial. I'm happy to hear that you are staying in close contact with your surgeon. It is very difficult to predict exactly when a wound will heal; there are many factors at play. It can take weeks or even months. It is important that you continue to care for the wound and keep it clean, this will reduce the time it takes to heal. Hope this helps and I wish you a speedy recovery.

Tummy tuck dehiscence?

Thank you for sharing. It is always unfortunate when these things happen. If you are seeing your PS regularly you can trust that he will take good care of you.

Your wound seems to have no sign of infection, keeping it clean is going to help speed up the healing process. Make sure you follow your PS instructions when cleaning and dressing your wound at home. 
The dehiscence seems superficial and should heal well with the right care and patience.

You might need wound debridement at some point. Your plastic surgeon will eventually opt for either wound closure by secondary intent (allowing the wound to heal on its own without surgical closure), or wound closure by delayed primary closure (a delayed surgical wound closure after initial wound cleansing and dressing for several days).

I understand your concerns and how hard or scary it may. But considering other possible complications this really is a a minor complication and it is easily treated.

Best of luck on your recovery!
Dr. Miguel Mota

Miguel Mota, MD
Dominican Republic Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.