How common is back pain after breast reduction?

I am two weeks post op for my breast reduction. I was a 36/38 M. Now looking to be leaning 38 DD/E. I have been feeling pretty well generqlly, however, since my stitches came out, I have started getting awful back pain around 7 pm. Is this normal? Is it just from the trauma? What else could the cause be? I have been off the percocets since day 3 and did a round of keflex.

Doctor Answers 4

Recovery after breast reduction in Melbourne, Florida

It is not uncommon to have back pain after breast reduction or breast or abdominal procedure due to often times it is simply uncomfortable and your positioning is different for a few weeks after surgery.  Typically, as patient’s recover, this tends to resolve on its own.  Check in with your board-certified plastic surgeon as well.  I hope this information is helpful to you.  Best of luck!


Melbourne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Back pain after reduction

Back pain can occur after a breast reduction. This can be secondary to positioning when you lie down.  It also can occur as a result of changing the way you lift things or be active right after surgery.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

How common is back pain after breast reduction?

It is not unusual to experience back pain following a breast reduction. The pain, howver, should be less than your pre-op state. The purpose of a breast reduction is two fold. First, reduction of the gland sould lead to an abatement of your symptoms, ie back, neck, shoulder pain. Next, the breast shape should improve with a smaller, rounder and lifted breast. Hope this helps. Good luck, Dr. PG

Back pain after breast reduction

Back pain is quite common after breast reduction. Keep in mind that you were on your back, on an operating table for quite a few hours!  If it persists, you should be worked up by the appropriate physicians but generally it improves within a few weeks.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.