Exercise after breast lift & augmentation?

I'm really stressed because during my pre op appointment the surgical coordinator told me that I cannot do pectoral exercises for 1 year after my breast lift & augmentation!!! Do I really have to wait a full year? I know I have to wait at least 6 weeks before working out upper body .

Doctor Answers 9

Exercise after a breast lift with implants

Every surgeon has his or her after surgery routine. My routine is 10-15 pound lifting limit for the first 6 weeks. Aerobic activity and core and lower body weighs can begin at 3 weeks. Upper body weights are started at minimum 6 weeks but gradually. I always tell patients that anything with the pectoral muscles like chest press or flys should be done with lighter weigjts to keep on tone. No need to use heavy weights.


Schererville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Exercise after BBA and lift?

Thanks for your question!  I tell my patients not to perform any chest exercises for 3 months following their surgery.  However, every plastic surgeon is different, and you really should direct this question to him if you have concerns.  He has a reason for what he recommends.  Good luck!

Exericise following breast implants with lift

This is a great question! I typically will request my patients to refrain from any vigorous exercise for four weeks following breast surgery. I always request to see my patients prior to resuming exercise to insure they are ready to start easing back into their normal routine. It is important to take it slow and allow your body time to resume your normal vigorous routine. The importance of refraining from vigorous exercise for this period is due to the time needed for the pocket to heal where the implants have been placed. Once this pocket has healed the incidence of implant shift is reduced dramatically and regular vigorous movement and exercise will not permanently alter placement. I always suggest following up with your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon prior to deviating from any post-operative regimen to insure safety and maximum healing is achieved. I do hope you have found this information helpful and I wish you luck! 

Ronald Downs, MD, FACS
South Bend Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Exercise after breast lift and augmentation?

You certainly do not have to wait a full year to exercise as it sounds you have been told. In fact we perform a 24-hour rapid recovery which involves arm movements the day of surgery. However you do not want to lie on your breast or do vigorous activity that might disrupt your early healing of the incisions. By placing the implants over the muscle we avoid the animation deformity that comes with moving and flexing your pectoralis muscle and also shorten the recovery significantly.

Exercise after breast lift with augmentation

Thank you for your question. It is very important to follow your specific surgeon´s instructions for recovery after surgery. Every surgeon will have his/her own preferences as to recovery for specific procedures. I suggest my patients to wait at least 3 to 5 weeks before running or exercise. It's best to be sure that everything is healed. There is always a chance of causing bleeding if you start much before that time. When you start, listen to your body. You will be a little out of condition and a bit sore. But you will get back to where you were before surgery very quickly. 

Exercise after breast lift & augmentation?

Excellent question. As a general rule, I tell my patients light activity only for the first 4 weeks because I don't want any aggressive up and down movement that could shift the implants--that could be walking and/or light strength training (not including the pec muscles). My rule is at 6 weeks, if all is healing well, they can start some light pec activity and increase to normal activity as tolerated.  I agree that a year is a long time but every surgeon has different guidelines so I would suggest checking back in with them  to be sure that is what they meant. As always, please make sure to consult with board-certified plastic surgeons for best recommendations. Good luck!

Megan Jack, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Resuming exercise postoperatively

Thank you for your question.  I would certainly recommend that you follow up with your plastic surgeon personally to find out what his or her recommendation is regarding resuming full activity including upper body exercises.  I typically allow my patients to resume full activity including upper body exercises at approximately 6 weeks postoperatively.  I encourage them to ease back into their work outs. You will want to definitely follow up with your plastic surgeon though to get his or her advice on your particular case.

James Shoukas, MD
Lake Mary Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Breast lift and augmentation: How long before I can do pectoral exercises?

It's always best to check with your surgeon about his or her protocol. I tell my patients they will be comfortable starting upper body weights and pectoral exercises by the 5th or 6th week. I advise them to listen to their bodies (how comfortable they are) for the appropriate level of exercise. I have several competitive body builders who resume their full training as early as 8 weeks after surgery. Hope this information is helpful. For more information on this and similar topics, I recommend a plastic surgery Q&A book like "The Scoop On Breasts: A Plastic Surgeon Busts the Myths."

Ted Eisenberg, DO, FACOS
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Exercise after breast lift & augmentation?

Thank you for your question:

  1. Waiting a year to do pectoral exercises after breast lift and augmentation sounds extreme to me
  2. I suggest that you see her plastic surgeon and person and clarify when you may begin to use your pectoralis exercises.
  3. In my experience when patients have an uncomplicated recovery after breast augmentation and lift I allow them to return to pectoralis exercises at 6 weeks.
  4. For more information please read the Linkbelow:

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.