Swelling at 12 weeks post op tummy tuck. Is it normal? (Photo)

My tummy tuck was about 12 weeks ago, while I'm extremely pleased with the over all result, I'm concerned about the persistent swelling. My tummy is flat every morning and fully rounded with soreness and uncomfortable tightness in the evening, feel like it was about to burst. Coughing and sneezing still hurt the muscle repair line from top to bottom. Incision has healed perfectly fine. Is this normal?

Doctor Answers 8

Swelling 12 weeks after TT

Hi there,
yes, it is possible to experience swelling and bloating up to 6 months after a TT.
we recommend all our patients to be on a high protein diet ( Dukan, free on line ) , 3 tall glasses of Metamucil sugar free a day, plenty of water, exercise daily, and yes, wear a tight Spanx or cincher.
Happy recovery,
you already look very good!
F. Mussat

Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Swelling Post- Abdominoplasty

It is not unusual for patients to have swelling that comes and goes for at least 3 months or more.  Many women take 6 months to a year for the changes to stop happening.  All within the realm of normal.  Continuing to wear compression on the abdominal area can be helpful.

Swelling at 12 weeks post op tummy tuck.

Swelling can be common late in the day after tummy tuck, and a support garment such as a Spanx can be helpful to get you through the day. It might take several more months to have things sort out fully.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Swelling at 12 weeks post op tummy tuck. Is it normal?

Yes, longer-term swelling after tummy tuck surgery is not uncommon; swelling may persist for many months and even up to one year after the procedure is performed. Often, patients will report that the swelling increases as their activity level increases and gets worse later on in the day. Sometimes, the use of compressive garments may be helpful to control the edema.

I would suggest that you continue to follow up with your plastic surgeon, who will be in the best position to assess your situation and provide you with specific recommendations. Best wishes for an outcome that you will be pleased with long-term care.

Swelling after TT

It is perfectly normal to have numbness or swelling after a tummy tuck which is expected to slowly have sensation return to normal after many months and even years following your surgery.

Although uncommon, permanent numbness and tingling can occur after tummy tuck surgery, especially in the lower mid line area between the scar and belly button. In most cases there is some sensation present, just not the normal pre-surgical amount. Please speak with your plastic surgeon about your concerns.

#tummytucknumbness #tummytuckpost-op

Swelling at 12 weeks post op tummy tuck. Is it normal?

The tightness, swelling, numbness, itching and hardness after a surgery like you had typically persists at least 8 weeks after the surgery then slowly goes away. It can easily take 4-6 months to see results. Your scars will also flatten and fade but usually takes 9-12 months. Hope this helps. Dean Vistnes.

M. Dean Vistnes, MD
Bay Area Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

Swelling at 12 week mark

Thank you for your question. Swelling can remain even at the 12 week mark. For some patients, it can take up to 3 months to see complete healing. Please be sure to visit your surgeon for follow-ups.

German Newall, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

Swelling at 12 weeks post op tummy tuck is normal.

Hi, hotboobs.  Thanks for your question and sharing photos.  It seems like you have a good result from tummy tuck already.  Swelling and bloating (especially later in the day) is normal during the recovery period.  The result of tummy tuck may take up to 6 weeks.  Good luck with your continued healing.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.