Can I get my tuberous breasts fixed without implants and will getting them fixed affect my ability to breastfeed in the future?

I have been uncomfortable with my breasts all my life. They've always been on the small side but they are tuberous. When I got pregnant and subsequently had my daughter, they got much bigger, which only worsened my insecurities. I am interested in having them corrected but I don't really want big breasts. I'm only interested in having an A cup. So my two questions are, (1) can they be fixed without implants and (2) will fixing them now hinder my ability to breastfeed in the future?

Doctor Answers 9

Correction of tuberous breasts


Thank you for your question. Many women with tuberous breasts feel insecure and express the same concerns about size, shape and nursing as you do.    An alternative to implants if needed, would be fat transfers to gently reshape the breast, in conjunction with a lift or nipple/areolar reshaping.  The ability to nurse may be affected by a lift, but less likely by fat transfers..  There are many options which are best reviewed after a face to face  consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon.  Good Luck,  Dr Bev

Short Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Tuberous breast

Long story short, it is much easier to do a great job of correcting tuberous breast when you have an implant to help stretch the breast into a round shape.  Without that adjunct, the surgery could be more difficult.  That is not to say that certain things cannot be done to help improve, such as reducing the size and bulging of the nipple, but, there are limitations.  Your first point is to schedule multiple consultations with board-certified plastic surgeons.
I hope this helps.
Best of luck!

Dr. Subbio
Board-Certified Plastic Surgeon
Newtown Square/Philadelphia, PA

Christian Subbio, MD
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Tuberous Breast Correction


Thank you for your question. There is a whole spectrum of characteristics which can be present to different degrees for Tuberous breasts. An in-person exam with your Plastic Surgeon would be key for planning the approach to correction. Typically, an incision around the areolas to resize/reposition them and reduce herniation means that there is some risk to function/breastfeeding after. As well, a silicone cohesive implant, even relatively small in size is most useful for correcting the shape of the breast. Bands of constriction under or all around the nipple can be released, allowing a new, rounded shape, but the implant will fill out and hold that shape. It is not necessary to increase breast size drastically. I recommend that you meet with a board certified Plastic Surgeon who specializes in this area and talk about your goals/expectations.

All the best

Tuberous breasts and implants

Tuberous breasts range along a spectrum of characteristics, and treating them is not a "one size fits all".  Every patient has different anatomy and different desires for a surgical outcome, so a unique plan must be set for each patient.  Some patients may benefit from implants while others may not.  Similarly, different surgical approaches carry different risks, including whether there may be an impact on breastfeeding.  An in-person consultation will best address your concerns.  In order to get a qualified, expert opinion on your surgical options and expectations visit a plastic surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

Best of luck,
Keith M. Blechman, MD
New York, NY

Fat transfer to correct tuberous breast

I like fat transfer breast augmentation to treat tuberous breasts. You may need multiple transfers to achieve your goals, but you can increase your breast size without implants and because there are no major incisions it shouldn't affect your ability to breast feed.

Sarah A. Mess, MD
Columbia Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Tuber breasts without implants

Thanks for your question. No, you do not need to have implants to correct a tuberous breast. A photo would be helpful to guide you, because the degree of laxity will dictate how to change the shape of the breast. I often find patients are confused about what is a tuberous breast and what is a constricted breast as well.  Sometimes a periolar lift will be enough,sometimes a full mastopexy is required to change the shape of the breast. In the example I've attached the patient had a full lift to reshape the breasts. If she wanted an implant she is a good candidate (now), but that was not her goal.

If you are a candidate for any lift, breast feeding could be affected, but the risk is generally low because lifts take place in the superficial layers of the breast usually above the structures that allow breast feeding.

I hope this has helped.

Adam Tattelbaum, MD
Washington DC Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 90 reviews

Tuberous breasts

Each patient may have different components or severity of a tuberous deformity, most of the time augmentation is necessary because there is not a lot of breast tissue.  It may impact breast feeding ability.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Breast evaluation

Hello and thank you for your question. In order to obtain the best advice, I recommend an in-person consultation.  They are likely many options to help you.  Make sure you specifically look at before and after pictures of real patients who have had this surgery performed by your surgeon and evaluate their results.  The most important aspect is to find a surgeon you are comfortable with. I recommend that you seek consultation with a qualified board-certified plastic surgeon who can evaluate you in person.

Best wishes and good luck.

Richard G. Reish, M.D.
Harvard-trained plastic surgeon

Richard G. Reish, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 67 reviews

Tuberous breast

If you have tuberous breasts, then fixing them will involve reshaping your gland and sizing down the areola.  This can be done without implants, though if you have very little breast tissue, often implants are used to balance out the breast.  People with tuberous breasts tend to have more problems breastfeeding.  Also, having this surgery on your breast could decrease your ability to breastfeed.

Tyler C. Street, MD
Napa Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.