Is the Levia laser effective in treating frontal fibrosing alopecia?

I have frontal fibrosing alopecia and my dermatologist recommended the Levia at home laser (it is UVB light within the 300-320 nm wavelengths). It operates around the same wavelength as the excimer laser (308 nm) that has been shown to be effective in the treatment of FFA. However, the unit is quite expensive and not covered by insurance. Does anyone have any knowledge of this laser and have any recommendations? Is it worth it?

Doctor Answers 3

Levia for FFA

There may be some benefits but these data are new and there are no good published studies in FFA to guide us. There are data with the 308 nm excimer. Certainly finasteride, dutasteride, steroid injections, topical steroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors (tacrolimus and pimecrolimus), hydroxychloroquine and doxycycline are at the top of the list. See a dermatologist who specializes in hair loss if this is the route you plan to take.

Regrowth may occur with finasteride and dutasteride in some patients. But for many of the treatments, halting further loss is the main goal of treating this scarring alopecia.


Vancouver Dermatologist

Understanding Hair loss and hair loss treatment options: hair transplant, prp and progesterone

This is unlikely to improve hair growth. I suggest seeing a hair loss expert now to evaluate and go over your condition and provide you information about your best treatment options. In our office, we use prp/progesterone with great results. Hair transplantation is an alternative. See an expert. Best, Dr. Emer

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 190 reviews

Low level light lasers

Low level light lasers have no proven value for the treatment of hair loss and certainly for frontal fibrosing aloopecia

William Rassman, MD
Los Angeles Hair Restoration Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

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