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Small Weight Gain During Recovery Phase of Abdominoplasty

I had an abdominoplasty two weeks ago. Since I'm unable to exercise I'm wondering if a small weight gain will effect the results? Prior to having surgery I got my body into excellent physical shape, and plan to get back to my workout routine as soon as my doctor gives me the okay. I just want to know if I should be following a super strict diet to reduce weight gain during the time I can't exercise.

Doctor Answers (8)

Weight gain after tummy tuck

+2

Do not look at a scale for a few weeks after a tummy tuck.. First heal, eat right and then go back to your exercise and diet regimen when your doctor says it is ok to do so.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Weight gain after tummy tuck

+2

A brief and temporary weight gain of 5-10 pounds is very normal during the recovery period following a tummy tuck. To some degree this is due to retained fluids. Within 3 weeks you should be able to return to light activities and by 6 weeks more strenuous.

Web reference: http://www.bodysculptor.com/body-surgery-chicago/tummy-tuck/

Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Small Weight Gains during Recovery After a Tummy Tuck

+2
Recovery from ALL surgery involves an acute phase of healing which involve inflammation associated with fluid retention, tissue stiffness and woody feeling. At 2 weeksafter aTummy Tuck,I would NOT worry about and would STRONGLY advise you against short-sighted diets. This is NOT the time to deny your body the nutrients the healing process requires. I would recommend you eat a diet high in proteins and resume exercising gradually when your surgeon recommends you do. Be patient. You will be glad you did. Dr. Peter Aldea
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Weight Gain after Surgery

+1

I would not recommend starving yourself while you are healing.  It is normal for some weight gain after surgery, it is just going to take time.  Once you are given the OK and can start exercising you will loose the weight. 

San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Diet after tummy tuck?

+1

As long as you have good eating habits, your weight gain should only be temporary due mostly to fluid retention. It is important during the healing stage, not to deprive your body of much needed nutrients. Within 6 weeks of your surgery, you should be able to get back to your regular exercise program

San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Don't worry about slight weight gain after tummy tuck

+1

It is not uncommon to gain a few pounds in the first few weeks after surgery, both due to inactivity, and also fluid retention (all kinds of surgery cause you to gain "water weight" for the first week or so after).  This is nothing to worry about.  Take it very easy now, take good care of yourself while you're healing so that you can get back to your normal routine as quickly as possible.  Eat a sensible diet of course, and the weight will fall off once you're released back to full activity. 

Wichita Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Small Weight Gain Should'nt Affect Result

+1

It is not uncommon to have a small weight gain following tummy tuck or other surgeries for the reasons you mentioned.  This should not have any significant effect on the ultimate result of your tummy tuck.

Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Small weight gain while recovering from a tummy tuck

+1

Small weight gain should not affect your final result. From your description, you sound as though you are very cognizant of weight gain and fitness. A super strict diet is probably not necessary.  Try to eat "clean" and your surgeon will get you back to the gym as soon as he/she can.  Hang in there, Dr. Parungao, 

Oak Brook Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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