Open bleeding wounds breast lift/reduction? (photo)

I had BR Surgery 21 days ago. After 10 days two open wounds near the T incition open. Left breast wound grew from a dime size to a quarter size. It still bleeds and won't heal. I'm using an antibiotic ointment, then a gauze that contains antibiotic directly in the wound to keep it moist and the sterilize gauze on top to protect the stitches and the wounds. My concern I don't see a scab building on it and keeps bleeding.

Doctor Answers (6)

Open wound after breast reduction

+2

Thanks for your question.  The T junction of a breast reduction incision is the most delicate area of a breast reduction surgery.  If the incision was intact and the color good the first week of surgery and then starts breaking down the second week of surgery you are simply moving around and doing things too much.  There are many factors what affect the healing of the skin in this area.  How thin the skin, do you smoke, consume caffiene, how active are you after surgery.  Moving around and lifting your arms will pull on this area of the breast and diminish blood flow to this area.  I have seen many times the incisions look perfect first week after surgery and then starts to break down the second or third week.  This is because the patient is no longer in pain and starts to think everything is Ok and resumes all normal activities.  The weak T-junction then starts to break down and may increase in size related to the continued use of her arms.  I usually prefer to cover this with Silvadene and not allow the wound to desicate  as this makes wound healing even longer.  The Silvadene is water soluble and keeps the open wound clean and moist, while preventing infection from setting in.  Letting a scab form will prolong the duration the wound can heal.  The longer the wound stays open the worse the scar will be come.  You need to be very inactive until this heals.  As you say it started out as a dime and now its a quarter.  This may increase even larger if you do not heed this advice.  Bleeding is a good sign that means the tissue underneath is alive and not necrotic. 


Honolulu Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Wound break down at inverted

+2

Separation of wound edges is not infrequent in breast reduction surgery.  Most heal uneventfully with a need to return to the OR.  Open wounds which bleed are actually healthy with good blood supply.  This is usually a favorable situation. If there is increasing pain, especially with redness around the wound, I would recommend seeing your surgeon.  In these situations I often culture the wound and assess the need for an oral antibiotic.  Most of these heal slowly, but in the long run heal with good cosmetic results.

Ronald A. Lohner, MD
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Wounds After Breast Lift/Reduction

+2

If you have been given that treatment plan of the ointment and gauze by your PS then keep following it.  The area of wound breakdown will heal from the bottom up over several weeks. 

Dr. ES

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Wound Healing Problem after Breast Reduction Surgery?

+1

Thank you for the question and picture.
 These types of superficial wound healing problems are not uncommonly seen after breast reduction surgery. The most important "step" for successful resolution, in my opinion, is close follow-up with your plastic surgeon. He/she will be able to recommend appropriate local wound care, treat any infection present, and/or remove any suture material that potentially will delay healing.
 

Generally speaking, patients who experience these types of superficial separations go on to heal well, without long-term detraction from the end results. Occasionally, if the scar in  the involved area is wide, scar  revision surgery may be helpful.
 

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
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T incision and wound healing issue on breast

+1

It is fairly common to have some delayed healing at the "T" incision for some breast reduction patients.  Keep in close contact with your surgeon.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Corner skin separation

+1

Unfortunately this is a common problem after reductions and lifts at the intersections of the incisions.  Healing requires blood flow and these are the areas with the least blood flow.  Dressings and ointments will get this to heal in time and then a scar revision can be performed if needed.  Close follow-up with your surgeon is my best advise and if you are a smoker or are near second hand smokers stay away as this is the number one cause of this problem.

Evan Sorokin, MD
Cherry Hill Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.