Nipple Asymmetry After Breast Augmentation? (photo)

Hello, I had breast augmentation surgery done few weeks ago, and I can notice a difference in the breasts, my left breast is more higher, the upper part is more full, and the nipple is looking down, not like the right breast. What could be the reason? How would I know if it's not due to seroma or hematoma, how can I check for that? Before surgery I never had asymmetry. I had 350cc in both breasts.

Doctor Answers (4)

Nipple asymmetry

+1

From your photos, your nipples appeared symmetric prior to surgery, but the lower folds were not, your left fold was higher than your right.  In the most recent photo, this is still the case.  It seems that the nipple asymmetry you have now is due to the left implant being higher than your right and causing your left nipple to point down.  This may improve with the skin relaxing more on the left, implant displacement exercises, a stabilizer band, more time for healing, but may be revised by lowering the fold if it does not improve over several more months.


Kahului Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Nipple asymmetry

+1

 I can see what concerns you. Thanks for attaching the series of photos which are most helpful.

Although the breast look quite even before surgery, the chest muscles underneath are rarely even is size and strength, and it is that that frequently contributes to early post-op asymmetry. One muscle is often tighter, pushing on the implant more than on the other side and causing the fluid to bulge in the upper pole. Almost always if the implants looked even in surgery they will look even after the implants settle and relax to accommodate the implants. This usually taked 3 months, sometimes longer. You probably wouldn't be able to recognize a small fluid collection, but your surgeon could. Any reassurance from those of us looking at photos pales by comparison to that from an in person evaluation from  your surgeon.

 

Thanks and best wishes. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Post Augmentation Asymmetry

+1

The absence of photos or an examination makes it difficult to give an accurate opinion. However, you are fairly early in your recovery period. At this stage there will be swelling and scarring that it talking place in your operative site. Your breasts need to heal. It will typically take 3 to 6 months to see your final results and in some women longer. During that time the swelling and the scarring process will start to subside and the soft tissues will start to accommodate allowing the implants to move into position. It is important to understand that these processes may not occur at the same time in your breasts. If that is the case, then you will have some asymmetries that should hopefully correct in time.

I would recommend that you continue close follow up with your plastic surgeon and make sure you voice your concerns. They are in the best position to help you at this juncture, as not only did they do the surgery, but they have been monitoring your recovery.

I hope this helps. Good luck.

Pedro M. Soler, Jr., MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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Uneveness after breast augmentation

+1

Without pictures or a physical exam, it is difficult to tell if there is a fluid collection in your breast.  If your surgery was done recently, breast asymmetry is very common in the early postoperative period.  Often, one breast implant will settle sooner than the other implant.  Eventually, they both reach a similar level and that can take at least 6 weeks in some patients.  Sometimes, it can take longer.  If you are concerned, make sure you follow up with your surgeon to ensure that a more significant problem is not present.

Naveen Setty, MD, FACS
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.