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What is the hard bump has appeared on the left side of my nasal bridge toward my eye area? (Photo)

I had surgery on dec 3, 2013...loved my results! Nose was perfectly straight. Doc told me to use my cast to apply pressure to the bridge to keep bones in place, I did. 2 mos later this bump has appeared and it feels hard like bone. When I put the cast on and squeeze it will disappear but it will reappear after several minutes. Now I'm very depressed because it looks worse than prior to surgery. I was given antibiotics in case of infection but it looks exactly the same 2 weeks after taking them.

Doctor Answers (5)

Dorsal bump

+1
More than likely the edge of bone after dorsal reduction and infracturing of the bones.  You may only require a small amount of rasping to reduce this irregularity after the bones are well healed, usually 2 months later.  Best wishes!


Fort Lauderdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

What is the hard bump has appeared on the left side of my nasal bridge toward my eye area?

+1
Over the internet we can ONLY guess! piece of bone, scar tissue, both??? Best to be seen in person in a second opinion visit... 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 64 reviews

Fluctuant bump nose

+1
Typically if something changes with pressure it is not boney.  There could be a small cyst there.  A steroid injection may settle it down.  If it is harder and fixed there may be a small spicule of bone there.  Don't worry too much.  If after a year it persists a little rasping could remove it.  Ask your surgeon about these options.

Terrence Murphy, MD
Englewood Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

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Bump After Rhinoplasty

+1
Hello,

The hard bump is the corner of your nasal bone, which is now 'sticking out'.  A very common problem after hump removal, regardless of technique.  Prior to surgery, there is a complex relationship between the edge of the nasal bone and the cartilage side walls of the nose.  The nasal bone normally overlaps this 'upper lateral cartilage', but it is very flush and seamless.  During hump removal this seam is put under stress and can be injured. Simultaneously, the normal relationship between the upper lateral cartilage and midline septum has been removed, and the upper lateral cartilage can drift toward the midline, exposing the bony edge.  This can be accentuated if the nasal bone has not been completely repositioned straight and is still angled outward.

Depending on your situation, which cannot be determined by your photographs, you could be a candidate for something as simple as injection with a filler like Juvederm or Restylane, which can either camouflage the bony edge or reposition the cartilage, depending on your need.  Alternatively, a revision surgery could be considered, and a 'spreader graft' can be fashioned and interpositioned between the septum and the upper lateral cartilage, pushing it flush with the nasal bone.  If needed, the bone can be further mobilized as well.

My one concern is your statement that it looks worse than before surgery and you are depressed.  Based on your photographs, it seems very subtle, even natural. You said you loved your results, indicating that your surgeon made positive changes to your nose.  I think that you are over-reacting to a minor issue, or at least you made an overstatement of your feelings.  There is certainly no reason to be depressed; your nose appears to be quite nice.  You should sit down with your surgeon and discuss this minor issue. I'm sure this can be sorted out quickly.

Best of luck!

Gerald Minniti, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Bump after surgery

+1
I think that you need an exam in person. If the bump goes away with pressure then it may be fluid.  If the bump is hard and occurred over time, then it could be bone ossification from the healing process.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.