Ask a doctor

Can Crepey Neck Skin After Submental Lipo Be Fixed?

Four years ago, when I had Submental Lipo, the surgeon told me my skin was tight enough to snap back. I look fine straight on. However; if I bend my head or neck, my neck looks like it belongs to someone much older. When I wear a turtleneck excess skin hangs over.

I've tried Titan, minimal results. Different Otolaryngologist/plastic surgeon wants to do only a mini lift to correct jowls for $7000. It doesn't seem worth it, if it won't fix issue. Or is there simply no fix?

Doctor Answers (7)

Mini lift vs real facelift

+2

Of course, the rotated photo isn't a perfect way to tell but it does look like you have real laxity in the neck. In my experience, you will only get a real and lasting improvement of that by completely undermining the neck and tightening the muscles and redraping the excess skin. Photos of my cheek and neck lifts and facelifts (same thing) are on RealSelf.

A mini lift will not undermine the skin and will also pull harder on it while producing less effect on the neck skin long term but also worse scars around the ears because of the tension on them.


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Mini lift for loose skin

+1

  I agree that a photo with your head turned sharply is not an ideal way for any of us to decide if there is skin laxity and excess. But it is likely that there is and that this would be improved with a well designed mini lift procedure.

Lawrence Kass, MD
Saint Petersburg Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Loose skin in neck

+1

Loose skin in neck really is best treated with a neck lift or mini-facelift.  The lasers to tighten the skin will give an incremental improvement.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

You might also like...

Mini face lift

+1

The mini face lift does not address the neck at all. There are lasers and light treatments and thermage treatment that claim to tighten skin. None of these treatments really do any thing.

The picture you posted is not adequate to advise you.

you need a full examination and an honost advise. Choose a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon and get more than one opinion then decide what you need do do to achieve the results you want.

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

Minilift vs Facelift

+1

A facelift can be preformed with a shorter incision in patients who have moderate skin excess. Depending on the surgeon, the two procedures can be considered variations of the same operation. The amount of skin excess that you have is moderate and can possibly be adressed with a short incision facelift. In this procedure, the SMAS and platysma muscles can be tightened, and excess skin can be removed around the ears and redraped to tighten your neck. The other non-surgical treatments you are considering may not be sufficient to correct the skin excess demonstrated in your picture. Good luck.

Dr. T

Behrooz Torkian, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Mini Lift or Facelift

+1

Hi,

Depending on how much skin is hanging, your best bet would either be a minilift or a facelift. The most important part of the procedure is the tightening of the Platyma and SMAS for longlasting results.

Best,

Dr.S.

Oleh Slupchynskyj, MD, FACS
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 209 reviews

A face or neck lift is likely the best option for loose or "crepey" skin

+1

Your best option is probably the use of a mini lift as suggested. Your condition is due to loose skin. Unfortunately, at this time, there is no technology that can effectively, consistently and predictably tighten skin despite numerous claims. If we had such a device, it would obviate the need for tummy tucks, breast lifts, and face lfits.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.