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I Have This "Ledge" That is Really Bothering Me!! :(

It started about 10wks or so and has continued (I am now 15 wks). It basically looks like I have a "ken doll" above and below my incision. It doesn't change on a day to day basis like normal swelling but I did notice the other night when I wore my binder (which I don't wear anymore) that it did help slightly. I am just worried that it's fat or leftover skin! It is right in the middle of my stomach between my bb and incision! Sorry but this is the best pics I have at the moment thank you!!!

Doctor Answers (5)

Ledge after tummy tuck.

+2

I hear you, and I sympathize with you. I've also seen many of these "ledges" in my patients. Most, if not all, resolve six months after the surgery. If your surgeon is board certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgeons he or she can deal with this ledge expertly. Trust your surgeon, and use tincture of time...it works.


Washington DC Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

"Ledge" after Tummy Tuck?

+1

Thank you for the question and pictures.

At your stage of recovery it is most likely that the “ledge” you are feeling/seeing  is related to soft tissue swelling that will dissipate over time. I would suggest that you allow for one year to pass before you evaluate the end results of your tummy tuck surgery.

In the meantime, continue to follow-up with your plastic surgeon for direct examination.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 682 reviews

Swelling after tummy tuck

+1

A moderate amount of swelling is expected after a tummy tuck. Most of this swelling will subside in the first 4-6 weeks after surgery. A common complication encountered after a tummy tuck is a fluid collection called a seroma.  Signs of a seroma include bulging, a palpable mass, and a visible fluid wave.  Although most seromas are diagnosed by physical exam, some require ultrasound.  Obviously, your best resource in regards to your particular issue will be the plastic surgeon who performed your intial procedure. 

Kelly Gallego, MD, FACS
Yuba City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

"Ken doll" above and below tummy tuck incision at 15 weeks post-op!

+1

Kimmys, this is an interesting description, but what your photos show (thanks for including) is a really nice result with the expected degree of post-operative edema (swelling) and induration (firmness) associated with this point in your recovery. The majority of your swelling has resolved by absorption, revealing areas of residual induration and lymphedema that is normal for this surgery. While there MAY be a tiny bit of "extra" fat or skin that could be revised if necessary, I would wait several more months (especially for cooler weather) to allow you and your surgeon to see your final result before considering any sort of additional "improvement."

I'd bet that as your scars continue to soften and mature, the firmness and swelling will also improve. Perhaps enough for you to be happy with what appears to be a well-performed procedure! And if not, your surgeon would probably be happy to try to improve upon his or her work with a revision for the cost of operating room and anesthesia. Discuss this with your surgeon, and be happy you chose your surgeon, for this truly is a good result! It may take more than 6 months to achieve a fully mature scar and all swelling resolved, so don't rush re-operation or think your surgeon is 'blowing you off" if more time is suggested.

For several example of my tummy tucks at various stages of scar healing and maturation click on the link below. Best wishes!

Richard H. Tholen, MD, FACS
Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 109 reviews

You may need to have scar revision

+1

Please discuss your concerns with your plastic surgeon. He/she would like to know about your concerns and it  would be a simple procedure to fix it. I would wait at least six months before any revision.

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.