Can Chin Implants Be Knocked out of Alignment?

My 16-year-old son is interested in getting a nose job and a chin implant. Since he is on his high shcool wrestling team, is it possible for the chin implant to be knocked out of alignment after the full recovery?

Doctor Answers (14)

No

+4

Once healed, chin implants are solid and heal directly against the bone. I believe that you would have to sustain a blow directly to the chin so hard that it would be more likely that you would fracture your jaw, than move the implant.

Chin implants are one of my favorite operations and combined with a rhinoplasty the procedures can significantly enhance one's appearance and self confidence. The chin is an important part of the face as witnessed by the many phrases we have in our society like: "keep your chin up", "he took it on the chin", "by the hair of your chiny chin chin" etc.

A recent study of the CEO's of Fortune 500 companies showed that not only are CEO's taller than the average poplulation, but they also tend to have a stronger chin than the general population. With the exception of people who started their own company, as opposed to being hired for the job. Such as Bill Gates, who has a soft chin.

Good luck.

Be sure to discuss your concerns with your surgeon, and they will advise you accordingly.


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Chin implants can shift with enough force

+3

Eric,

In general, chin implants are very stable. However, early after surgery, before the body has fully incorporated the implant, it is possible for it to shift. Even over time, if there is significant force, it would be possible for it to shift.

My advice would be to hold off on the surgery until your son is not participating is such activities.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Chin implants can shift

+3

Chin implants in most cases are stable with excellent cosmetic improvements where facial convexity and profile are concerned. Chin implants vary widely however in shape and material. They can be made of solid silicone, or of a plastic material polyethylene. They can be shaped as a small button, or extended along the length of the lower jaw and blended according to need. They can be fixed to the bone, or shaped to rest against it.

Chin implants are not free of problems or risks, though risk can be managed. Shifting does occur in some implants over time yet trauma is unlikely to cause the shift. A well selected and placed chin implant can last a lifetime.

A note of caution concerning Rhinoplasty: contact sports such as football, wrestling, and even basketball do raise a red flag. With Rhinoplasty even after full healing the nose is more easily fractured in contact sports. You may want to wait until the last season is over to protect your investment.

Best of luck.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

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Chin Implant Shifting

+2

Yes, chin implants can shift if trauma occurs early in the recovery process.  As each week passes, it becomes much more difficult for this to occur.  Ultimately, the chin implant should become integrated with the body so that shifting can become more difficult.  

Anil R. Shah, MD
Chicago Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 71 reviews

Chin implants are better tolerated

+2

I have had football players have nosejobs and then re-injure the nose and destroy our goodwork. I have a son who is a wrestler and has had his nose pushed into the mat many times. Your son should wait until his wrsetling career is over before undergoing a cosmetic rhinoplasty. As for the chin implant, these are better tolerated.

Robert M. Freund, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Yes, but only through significant trauma early after surgery

+2

The short answer is yes. A significant trauma early after surgery could do that. In general, the implant is placed in a very tight pocket and is stable but not to the point of tolerating direct trauma. I would also think about the nose job. It will be much more disturbing to have trauma to the nose following Rhinoplasty.

Hisham Seify, MD, PhD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Potential trauma to the nose is more concerning

+2

It is theoretically possible for the chin implant to be knocked out of alignment, but it will require a significant blow and trauma. More concerning will be the potential trauma to his nose after rhinoplasty. I did surgery on wrestlers before, and some of them had to wear a custom-made helmet and mask to protect their face and nose after surgery. I realize it is not always possible, but it might be something to consider. Alternatively, you can wait with surgery till your son is done with high school.

Stella Desyatnikova, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

It is highly unlikely that it could be knocked out of position

+2

When the body heals, it firmly secures the implant in the position it was placed. If it was placed correctly, then it should stay there. It would require a tremendous amount of force to move it, and that amount would probably fracture the jaw.

I have been doing this for years and have never seen one be moved by trauma.

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

I would not put a chin implant in a wrestler or a boxer

+2

To ericl123,

Hi! Chin implants are safe, quick and easy to do,and stable. I use them very frequently (more in boys than in girls because a strong jaw line is even more important for an attractive male appearance). But they are not immune to trauma.

Your son should just do his nose now, or put off both procedures until his wrestling career is over.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Not after the initial healing

+2

Having been a wrestler myself, I can tell you there is a great deal of trauma to the chin and nose in wrestling. So the best time to have the surgery is after the wrestling season ends. Once the implant and nose are healed, it will take as much force to move the implant as to break the jaw. So enjoy your wrestling and avoid a "sugarloaf".

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.