2 Weeks After Breast Augmentation, a Lot of Blood Leaking from Incision Site, Should I be Worried?

I'm 2 weeks post op. Dark blood's been coming out of my incision site on right breast since yesterday. My PS's nurse told me it's just old blood from bruising, which developed at 10 days post op (didn't have any before, PS said it's prob cuz I did something at school). Today the bleeding was often. I went through 5-6 adhesive pads. The dark blood was coming out continuously for a bit . I did notice the bruising around incision site has lightened. But the excessive bleeding worries me. Am I ok?

Doctor Answers (9)

Bleeding form the incison 2 weeks after Augmentation

+1

I agree, it is not normal to have bleeding 2 weeks after your procedure and you need to see your Surgeon ASAP!


Baton Rouge Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Hematoma in breast

+1

From your description it sounds likeyou could have a hematoma. Is yoru breast larger in size than your opposite breast. Do you have a lot of pain?  I suggest you see your surgeon ASAP!

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Bloody drainage after augmentation is sign of a hematoma

+1

The dark bloody drainage coming through your incision line is very worrisome and could represent a hematoma or collection of blood around the implant. Further problems such as infection and capsular contracture could be in store so you should see your surgeon right away.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

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Bleeding after Breast Augmentation

+1

Yes, you should be worried. This "old blood" may represent a Hematoma (a free collecrtion of blood in the pocket surrounding the implant). Left untreated, a hematoma may not be absorbed completely and increases your risk of developing a capsular contracture. Get back with your surgeon because if you have a hematoma it should be surgically drained.

 

Joseph Fata, MD
Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Bleeding after breast augmentation

+1

I agree with the other surgeons in this post who recommend seeing your plastic surgeon. Just as the blood is coming out of a wound, bacteria can be going through and into the wound. Low-grade infections after hematoma and drainage can lead to chronic capsular contracture. Evacuating the hematoma, washing out the pocket and the implant, stopping any continued bleeding and replacing your implant now may be necessary.

David Janssen, MD, FACS
Oshkosh Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Bleeding after breast augmentation

+1
It sounds like a hematoma. If you have a wound through which bleeding is occuring, then you need to see your plastic surgeon, not a nurse, given the amount of bleeding you have described. You may need drainage of the hematoma and antibiotics. Whenever there is a foreign body, the concern would be for an infection which could develop and result in removal of the implant.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Go see your doctor

+1

Get to your plastic surgeons office. This is not something for an internet consultation, you need to be seen and evaluated in person.

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Drainage after Breast Augmentation?

+1

Thank you for the question.

You are wise to be concerned about significant drainage. I would suggest continued close follow-up with your plastic surgeon. Keep the area covered with sterile dressings.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 681 reviews

Bloody drainage two weeks postoperative

+1
You should be concerned about a large amount of dark bloody drainage two weeks after surgery. It is possible that you had developed a hematoma (collection of blood) that is now being expressed through the incision. If this is the case you should see your surgeon ASAP to be evaluated. You mY need the wound opened and the hematoma evacuated. If this persists without care, you may be at risk for developing an infection, which might necessitate the removal of the implant for at least three months. Alternatively, you may develop capsular contracture (hardening of the implant).

Todd C. Case, MD
Tucson Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.