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Cocaine After Nose Job, Could I have Done Damage?

I had a rhynoplasty on January and after one month I got really drunk and did cocaine two nights. I have stopped doing it for real and won't do cocaine never again but I am worried if I will have a problem even if I don't do cocaine again.

Doctor Answers (5)

Cocaine After Nose Job

+1

It is unlikely that a 2 instances at a month post-op would cause major damage but if you have concerns you can have your surgeon examine the inside of your nose.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 147 reviews

Damage Secondary to Cocaine after Rhinoplasty

+1

Circulation is compromised secondary to cocaine which could damage tissue recovering from rhinoplasty surgery. Your surgeon will answer your question after examining your nose.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Cocaine After Nose Job, Could I have Done Damage?

+1

 You should have this discussion with your Rhinoplasty Surgeon along with an examination of the inside of the nose to rule out any damaged that may have been caused.  The vasoconstrictive nature, of the drug, can cause healing issues with a Rhinoplasty and/or Septoplasty.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Cocaine use after rhinoplasty

+1

Cocaine compromises the blood flow in the nose so you can do damage inside your nose. You should check in with your surgeon to make sure everything is healing properly.

Thomas A. Lamperti, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Cocaine use and rhinoplasty

+1

It is certainly very possible for you to have harmed the inside of your nose especially the septum and this could compromise your result. I would go back to your physician and have them check your result to be safe.

Scott Trimas, MD
Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.