High nearsightedness: lasek, ICL, or Artiflex? I would greatly appreciate any advice!

I am 22 years old and have worn glasses since I was 8. I received different advice from 3 doctors concerning lasek, ICL, or Artiflex. One doctor recommended either lasek or ICL, but with lasek, there is a high possibility of needing correction glasses. The other doctors recommended Artiflex and lasek, respectively. Right/Left nearsightedness:-10.5/-9.75 astigmatism:-1/-1.5 intraocular pressure:15/14mmHg Cornea thickness:535/538μm Pupil size:6.0/6.5mm Pupil dryness:2-4mm aberrations:0.175/0.178

Doctor Answers 2

Treatment options for high correction

Although your corneas are slightly thinner than average, they are still thick enough to safely have LASIK. A femtosecond-laser created flap (such as IntraLASIK) would allow a thin flap, and a safe ablation depth. LASEK, also known as PRK or epi-LASIK is also a perfectly good option. In my experience, both LASIK and LASEK have an extremely high chance of getting you out of glasses. That being said, the ICL does have a slightly higher accuracy at your level of correction. Internationally, the ICL allows for astigmatic correction, but in the US it does not. If you were living in the US, you would need a LASIK touchup after the ICL was placed, to get rid of remaining astigmatism. The disadvantage of the ICL is increased expense.


San Diego Ophthalmologist

Icl or Lasek

We know that when laser vision correction, either surface or Lasik, can create annoying quality of vision problems as well as loss of corneal structural integrity when used with higher prescriptions such as yours. For that reason phakic lens implants are a much better choice. We have tried all varieties but find that the Visian ICL is superior in terms of safety and outcomes. It also can be provided in a Toric variety to address your astigmatism. 

Martin L. Fox, MD
New York Ophthalmologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.