What is this at the end of my tummy tuck scar? Do I have swelling or seroma on my right side and above my belly button? (Photos)

I had my full Tummy Tuck with muscle repair on June 6th so almost 7 weeks post op. After I workout and at night I notice my stomach swelling up on right side & above my belly button. I also noticed my left side feels great and doesn't swell up but it has this strange nipple looking thing at the end of my scar. What is this? I don't see my surgeon until the end of August should I make an appointment sooner than that?

Doctor Answers 5

Dog ears form at the ends of incisions

such as yours.  Did you ever sew and cut out a triangle and pull the bases together?  There is excess material at the peak of the triangle and pleats and darts take care of that in sewing.  In surgery, excisions and purse-string closures usually will resolve it if problematic.  Yours are small, very small and often they settle into oblivion with time.

Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

What is this at the end of my tummy tuck scar? Do I have swelling or seroma on my right side and above my belly button?

Swelling after a tummy tuck procedure is common. Sometimes the swelling will be asymmetrical initially, but resolves with time. 
A collection of fluid under the skin can occur, but can typically be felt under the skin by your surgeon if it is present.
The fullness at the end of your scar appears to be some gathering of the skin from the underlying sutures. This typically also gets better with time.
Anytime you have a real concern, it's always a a good idea to touch base with your surgeon. You seem to be doing well.

7 Weeks Post TT - Do I Have A Seroma & What Is This At The End Of My Abdominoplasty Scar?

Thank you for your excellent pictures.  Obviously, an in person exam would allow your RealSelf team of plastic surgery experts to give you the most definitive answers to your questions.
That being said, your pictures plus the history of swelling after working out indicate to me that your swelling is just swelling and should decrease in both volume and intensity over the next 6 months.  
As far as the small out-pouching at the end of your abdominoplasty incision, this is a trick some plastic surgeons use to end a lengthy incision, especially when the incision goes around a curve.  Given time, these tiny bumps tend to shrink up and then usually vanish.  
Finally, if you have questions about your plastic surgery procedure, it's always appropriate to communicate with your personal plastic surgeon.  I am sure he or she will be happy to set your mind at ease.

Healing Tummy Tuck

Looks like you are healing well from your Tummy Tuck. Not sure what the swelling is, but it is not uncommon for one side to swell a bit more than the other, especially after exercise. It could be many things, including swelling or fluid collections. Your plastic surgeon should be able to tell you something more specific when you see them.
The bump at the end of your scar looks like skin redundancy. Sometimes called a "dog ear", it is caused by making the scar little too short. Often, small "dog ears" will resolve in a few months. If it persists, a short office procedure can provide a flatter, though slightly longer scar. If it turns red, becomes painful or otherwise starts giving you trouble, then it is something else and you should see your plastic surgeon sooner.

Joseph Mele, MD
Walnut Creek Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Tummy tuck scar

Swelling in your abdominal region after an abdominoplasty procedure is common and could take a few weeks to heal. Allow your body to recover by not moving too much and resting your abdominal region, avoiding tension. You will need a follow up with your surgeon to assess you.

Charles Nduka, MD
London Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.