Is it okay to try to conceive a month after Dysport injections to forehead?

My husband and I are wanting to try to conceive in the near future; however the fact that I got Dysport a month ago came across my mind and I'm not sure if it is safe for us to go ahead and try to conceive, or if we should wait another two or three months when the product has dissolved. Thank you in advance for your response.

Doctor Answers 8

Dysport and trying to get pregnant

Dysport is a medication injected into target muscles to selectively weaken them for the purpose of fewer and softer wrinkles.

Dysport is absorbed by the muscles very quickly. The amount circulating in the body is almost insignificant. There are no studies in pregnant or breastfeeding mothers; however it is recommend to not RECEIVE any treatment while pregnant or breastfeeding just to be safe.  If you've waited a month after your last injection to try to conceive you are safe. I would also inform you Obstetrician of your Dysport injections. Safety comes first. 

San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Dysport before pregnancy

Hey madiscurt, 

There is no problem with your recent treatment with trying to get pregnant. Dysport and Botox recommend that women who are pregnant or breastfeeding not get treatment- there has been no studies that point to this being dangerous but we as professionals feel that the risk "baby getting botulism" far outweighs the possibility of some mild wrinkles forming. 

Hope this helps and good luck with the babies!

Dr. Robb

Philip K. Robb Jr., MD
Evans Physician
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Dysport (or Botox) and Pregnancy

When you have a treatments like Dysport and Botox the medication binds to the nerves very quickly.  While there may be a very small amount of the medication circulating through your body right after treatment, it is gone very quickly.  For that reason conceiving a month after a treatment should not be a problem.   However, it is recommended that you not receive any of these treatments while pregnant or nursing. 

Hope this is helpful. 

Marc Cohen, MD
Philadelphia Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Generally we recommend waiting a few months.

However, it is likely perfectly safe.  There is a small study of patients who need botulinum toxin for medical reasons treated during or immediately before pregnancy with no issues.  Certainly we get calls from women who discover that they were actually pregnant when they were treated.  I have never seen a case where this was actually a problem.  We simply lack evidence that is safe.  If you need more personal advice regarding this, ask your personal gynecologist.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Getting pregnant after Dysport

It is perfectly fine to get pregnant at this point. There is a minute possibility that the Dysport enters the bloodstream in any measurable quantity only in the first few hours. After that, it is absorbed by the nerves and not available to pass to a fetus. There are no studies, nor will there be any, of the risk to the fetus from Botox or Dysport. The risk is probably minimal to none but I don't ever inject anyone who is possibly pregnant.

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Is it okay to try to conceive a month after Dysport injections to forehead?

Having previous Dysport of Botox injections will not effect your chance of conceiving or put any risk to a baby. It is contraindicated to continue with these injections once you have conceived though, due to lack of study in a developing fetus. 

Lawrence Bundrick, MD
Huntsville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Go For It!

There is no need to wait. There is no evidence that there would be a negative impact your baby. Best, Dr. Emer

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 158 reviews

Perfectly ok

There is very little migration of botox products immediately after injection and all the botox that was injected (or disport in your case) will have been excreted or bound to its target now so will have no chance to affect your pregnancy. As I am sure you can imagine, the sheer numbers of botox applications every year in child bearing age women would ave led to some evidence of problems by now if there were any. So far there have been no concerns at all.

Hope that helps 

Adam Goodwin

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.