Do I have pectus excavatum bad? (Photos)

Will it stay like this forever...or will it go away after awhile

Doctor Answers 3

Pectus Excavatum

An implant may be a reasonable treatment alternative to improve the appearance. This developmental anomaly was present at birth and will not diminish over time. Schedule an in-person consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon who frequently performs these pectoral implants and can address all your concerns.

Kenneth Hughes, MD, Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

Los Angeles, CA


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 492 reviews

Pectus excavatum is a developmental anomaly and will not get better over time without surgery

Thank you for your question and for the pictures.

Pectus excavatum is a development anomaly and will not get better over time.

The good thing is that your pectus excavatum seems moderate by the pictures;  I correct those with a custom-made implant for the last 14-15 years.  It involves meeting your plastic surgeon for a molding to be made, which is then shipped to be fabricated and sterilized.  Once made, the implant can be inserted.  The making of the implant requires craft and artistry but the surgery itself is relatively simple.

Hope this helps!

Kind regards,

Dr. Marc DuPere, Aesthetic, cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgeon


Marc DuPéré, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Do I have pectus excavatum

Thank you for asking about your pectus excavatum.

You do have pectus excavatum - it is caused by the bones of the chest and will no go away. But the good news is that with a custom-made pectoral implant it can be corrected. Please see a plastic surgeon who does these implants to find out what is involved.

Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon. Best wishes. Elizabeth Morgan MD PHD FACS

Elizabeth Morgan, MD, PhD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.