Will a J-Plasma treatment help my eyes look refreshed enough to avoid a blepharoplasty? (Photo)

I have seen before & afters and am impressed with the J-Plasma treatment. I was considering getting a lower Transjunctional Blepharoplasty. I am wondering if I do this before hand if it may be enough improvement to avoid surgery? Also, I am currently unaware of a Doctor in Los Angeles who does this procedure, as I understand it's new. If you know of any please inform me. Thanks in advance for your help with my questions.

Doctor Answers 6

Will a J-Plasma treatment help my eyes look refreshed enough to avoid a blepharoplasty?

Minimal treatments get minimal improvements. If you want a result that will not only equal but be better than blepharoplasty consider either ablative CO2 laser or a phenol based  peel. While an examine is needed for final recommendation, your photo suggests that you would benefit more from a brow lift surgery than a blepharoplasty surgery.


Downey Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Not enough

Based on your photos and concerns, a J plasma treatment may not be enough to meet your expectations.  Its best to seek consultation with an experienced board certified surgeon for possible blepharoplasty.

Brian K. Machida, MD, FACS
Ontario Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.1 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Laser vs blepharoplasty explained

Thanks for sharing.  The aging eyelid composes of loose skin, prolapsing fat and possibly muscle.  Laser skin resurfacing whether it is J Plasma or Fraction CO2 will only treat mild loose skin.  A blepharoplasty addresses all of the variables contributing to the aging eyelid.  Discuss with several experienced board certified surgeons to review your candidacy. 

Raymond E. Lee, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

J plasma treatment for eyelid aging?

This will not remove excess skin and bags which is your problem. These "treatments" come and go and many people participate in the "learning curve". See an experienced blepharoplasty surgeon. The quality of the skin can be better improved after this with a phenol peel.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

There is nothing unique or magical about this method.

This is superficial ablative skin treatment.  The same level of injury is accomplished with a deep ablative fractionated laser treatment.  This treatment is getting hyped by the company that makes the device but there is no inherent advantage with the method.  It is unrealistic to expect that this treatment will accomplish something that is not currently available with other technologies.  Healing will be no faster with this treatment vs fractionated CO2.  The treatment ablated approximately 200 microns of skin.  This will actually be quite aggressive for the lower eyelid and likely to cause full thickness scaring of the eyelids.  I strongly advise you from rushing out to find this treatment.  Many of these new services have a complication curve that needs to be resolved with experience to actually produce a stable, safe treatment.  I personally think you would do better with a phenol chemical peel of the lower eyelid area.  Caveat emptor!

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

J plasma

The J plasma procedure is an intriguing new technology for improving fine to moderately severe wrinkles. I have seen some amazing results from it, and I suspect you would get some improvement in this regard. However, resurfacing procedures cannot improve all the components of the aging eyelid. For example, you have some fat herniation of the lower eyelids, and this would remain after a resurfacing procedure. Asking J plasma to address all these issues is asking too much of the procedure.

Ben Lee, MD
Denver Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.