I think I may have a buffalo hump on the back of my neck? (photo)

I noticed this "hump" like raised area on the back of my neck slowly appearing over the last year, it recently got worse in the past few months. I am 23 year's old, 5'2'', and I weigh 170, I have been actively eating and living healthier for the past year, and i've been seeing a chiropractor for my chronic neck pain and my forward head posture. I was wondering what could be done about this unsightly hump?

Doctor Answers 3

Fatty Buffalo Humps Can be Treated With Liposuction

If the buffalo hump is composed solely of fat, liposuction or a noninvasive fat elimination technique, such as Vanquish, CoolSculpting, or Thermi, should be able to remove it. Please consult a board-certified dermatologist to determine if the hump is made of fatty tissue or if bone is involved. A few medical conditions can also cause this condition so that laboratory testing by your physician is recommended.

San Diego Dermatologic Surgeon
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Buffalo hump on back of neck

Thank you for asking about your lump on your neck.

  • The hump will either be from a fat deposit or from bone.
  • If your chiropractor has been manipulating this area and the lump has appeared, it may be a fat deposit that has occurred in response to that.
  • Or it could be from hormones, weight gain or other causes.
  • To find out if it is fat, see a plastic surgeon - fat can be removed with liposuction.
  • Or it may be bone over the cervical spine - in which liposuction would not be beneficial

Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon. Best wishes, Elizabeth Morgan MD PHD

Buffalo hump?

Thanks for your inquiry and picture, but without an exam it is hard to advise if the hump is fatty or bony in nature.  Please see a plastic surgeon to discuss, good luck.  

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.