Why do I have a blister like bump on lip after Mohs surgery for BCC just above lip line? (Photo)

BCC just above lip line. Blister like bump was present with the stitches and after stitches were removed. Never saw surgeon after surgery. Called office and nurse said to wait it out. Now at six weeks, saw regular dermatologist today. She asked me if I had had anything on my lip in this area, no, I did not. She didn't seem to know what this could be or caused from. Told me to wait a month and return to surgeon if not changed. I am comfortable with this. I rather go back sooner that later.

Doctor Answers 3

Bump at incision site

While I have trouble seeing enough detail in your photo, the bump you describe at the lip line may represent scar tissue.  Collagen formation is at its maximal at 6-8 weeks after surgery, and this often presents as a raised or bumpy scar.  Scar massage and steroid injections may be helpful to flatten and soften scars.  You would do well to follow-up with your surgeon for an in-person evaluation and discussion of treatment options.  Good luck in your recovery.


Atlanta Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Bump on lip after MOhs surgery

often scar tissue on the lip from surgery in that location will result that can look like a bump but you should discuss with mohs or plastic surgeon. 

I recommend you to discuss specific issues regarding your questions with your dermatologist. 

Steven Hacker, MD
West Palm Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Bump

Thank you for your question. It is hard to see what is going on with the photo you provided. It could be scar tissue in the area from the procedure. I would recommend you follow up with the surgeon for an evaluation. 

Lenore Sikorski, MD
Orange County Dermatologist
4.3 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.