Excess sweating from my head (vertex part). What can I do to reduce it?

Does excess head sweating( specially from the vertex part of my head sweats a lot) is also one of the cause of baldness? What can i do to reduce my sweating. Basically i sweat if i am having even little bit of spicy food or feel hot.

Doctor Answers 8

Botox for the head is effective

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Regional treatments like Botox may help improve your quality of life.

It is expensive and can be used in the groin, scalp, face, neck, back, hands, feet. 

Generally, reserve sympathectomy for the most severe cases after all else fails to reduce hyperhidrosis. 

I have used Botox in all of these areas. 

H Karamanoukian MD FACS

Center for Excessive Sweating, established 1999

Sweating from the vertex

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Thankfully, sweating does not cause baldness.  Craniofacial hyperhidrosis typically involves several treatment options:

  • Botox- The standard for hyperhidrosis with local side effects only.  May require a larger dose for the scalp.
  • Oral medications- Typically involve anticholinergic medications such as glycopyrrolate and are not well tolerated.
  • Topical medications- Usually not advisable to put drysol on the scalp
  • Surgery- May be last resort for some patients but hyperhidrosis treatments tend to be moving away from this
  • LASERS/Miradry/ Radiofrequency- Very effective in other parts of the body.  Not ideal for scalp as some hair loss can be seen.

Anil R. Shah, MD
Chicago Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 171 reviews

Hyperhidrosis treatment for head

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Thank you for your question. Neuromodulator injections such as Botox directly to the scalp will help to treat the excessive sweating in this area, which incidentally is not linked to alopecia (or scalp hair loss). Results typically last for up to 6 months.

Please consult with an experienced and well trained practitioner to ensure your safety and to achieve optimal results.

Best wishes

Botox for sweating.

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Botox injections are safe to use in the scalp area, and should provide relief for 3-6 months. There is no association between sweating in this area and hairloss....Best luck, Dr P.

Excess sweating from my head. What can I do to reduce it?

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Thank you for sharing your question and I am sorry to hear of your sweating difficulties.  Though I do not think your sweating is contributing to baldness you can treat it with administration of Botox to your scalp.  This should give you 4-6 months worth of relief.  Hope this helps.

Head sweating.

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Treatment with Dysport or Botox can reduce sweating in many areas of the body. Sweating is not associated with hair loss. Best, Dr. ALDO

Hair loss and Sweating

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It is unlikely that sweating would cause baldness. I suggest you see an expert there is a lot of non invasive options (Botox, Glycopyrrolate, Beta Blocker) for this to give improvement. For hair loss, there are great non-invasive options like PRP/progesterone which can be used in combination with Rogaine for great results. See an expert. Best, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 203 reviews

Scalp sweating treatment

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This can be improved with Botox. It is injected into the areas of concern and will stop the sweating for 4 or more months. The procedure takes about 5 minutes to do. Infini is a more permanent solution but the hair is at risks for injury possibly but unlikely.

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 53 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.