I had a PicoSure tattoo removal, and the setting was far too high. What about scarring, burn consequences, lymphatic etc.?

The clinic admitted their mistake. They had the setting as if I had multiple treatments done already. I left in unbearable pain, and 1 week later my skin is burned red still, blisters and very painful still. I had other treatments before on other tattoos and it was nothing like this. They had the settings as if all treatments had been done on this tattoo and they weren't. What are complications to having settings far too high and it is also a very large tattoo (half my back).

Doctor Answers 2

Healing After Picosure Tattoo Removal

At one week post treatment, it is still too early to know how this will ultimately heal.  Redness and blistering of the skin are not uncommon with picosure treatments, and, with proper wound care, and allowance of appropriate time for healing, they usually resolve without sequelae.  I would advise you to return to the clinic to manage your post-treatment recovery, which may take several weeks.  In the meantime, be sure to keep that area covered with moisturizing agents like aquaphor, and protect it from the sun.

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Picosure tattoo removal and burn

Blisters and redness after a Picosure tattoo removal treatment is not unusual.  It is a more powerful laser than older Q-switched lasers, but it is supposed to result in less collateral heat damage.  However it doesn't mean blisters and redness cannot occur and it often does.   It can more commonly occur in areas with green ink due to the wavelength of the laser.  With proper after care and wound care, there is usually very little scarring even with blistering, and you can have a repeat treatment in 8 weeks.  I would suggest returning to the clinic for wound care until you are comfortable caring for it yourself, but the pain and blisters should resolve in a couple weeks.

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