How can one tell if they were trated with a REAL Ultherapy machine?

I have dry eyes, and a detached retina. The nurse at the spa said the doctor is friends with the inventor of Ultherapy. They are registered under the ultherapy website. Something is not right. I have been to several TOP Ulthera offices, that said, this is not normal, and they maybe using fake machines. Can anyone give me insight into this problem? Is there anyway to get a computer print out of my treatment? Would a spa buy the machine and then use a fake one to save money? Confused.

Doctor Answers 7

Fake ultherapy?

The spa may be using another type of machine but call it ultherapy.
There is only one real Ultherapy.
Go to their website and see a photo of the machine and compare it with yours.  also check that your machine has the ulthera label/logo on it.....  Not sure how you would get dry eyes or a detached retina unless a poorly trained ultherapy technician treated you.  after all - ultherapy is a user dependant tool, like a hammer can build nice piece of furniture or kill some one.... in the right or wrong hands.
Hope this helps!

Albany Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Ultherapy treatments in Los Angeles

Ultherapy is FDA approved. I would suggest you always go to a surgeon that you trust. Ask the office if it was indeed Ultherapy. 

Dr. Karamanoukian 
Los Angeles

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.8 out of 5 stars 93 reviews


The Ulthera machine does allow the technician to print out the exact treatment that was performed and how many lines were administered to each area. It is important that a board certified plastic surgeon or their properly trained staff is performing this treatment. Usually these salon and/or spas do not provide this level of expertise. 
Hope this helps, good luck!

Brian S. Glatt, MD, FACS
Morristown Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Retinal detachment cannot occur from standard Ultherapy treatment lines

Thank you for your question.

Call the company and see if they sell them transducers for the Ultherapy device and relay your concerns to Ulthera and Merz Aesthetics.

Read my ebook about Ultherapy on the link below.

Dr Karamanoukin

Fake Ulthera machines

There are probably fake machines of all sorts being used.  Do you think the dry eye and retinal detachment came about because of the ulthera?  No way would it cause a dry eye, fake or not.  And to cause any damage to your retina, they would have to be doing the treatment on your eye.  Can't imagine that anyone would do that with either a real or face ultrasound.  

John J. Martin, Jr., MD
Coral Gables Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Genuine ultherapy machine

This is why you don't get a medical therapy at a spa performed by a nurse. Find out who the doctor is who owns the spa and direct your concerns to the doctor and if you don't get satisfaction, contact your state's medical board and department of Health.

Edwin Ishoo, MD
Winchester Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.4 out of 5 stars 20 reviews


Thank you for your question.  Unfortunately, yes people will do anything to save money and there are fake devices out there of all kinds, not just Ultherapy.  All you have to do is go on Ali Baba and you can find all sorts of counterfeit Ultherapy, Coolsculpting, Hydrafacial machines, etc. Genuine Ultherapy machines do generate a patient file that is stored locally on the Ultherapy machine, I am unsure if it can be printed out.  However you can contact Merz the maker of Ultherapy and let them know your experience and they can retrieve the treatment from the machine if your "spa" won't let you have access to it.  As well, like all device makers, Merz takes a hard line stance against counterfeiting of their products and it likely to investigate/prosecute if a spa is advertising Ultherapy and not using genuine Ultherapy so it would be good to contact them and let them investigate.  Regards, Dr. Matt Elias

Matthew Elias, DO, FAAD
Fort Lauderdale Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.