Have any surgeons considered using Liposuction as a treatment approach for Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome?

I’m told the only effective treatment for PCOS is “weight loss”, but research shows that it’s the excessive fat cells that are producing the excess hormones contributing to the hormonal imbalance of PCOS in the first place, making it near impossible to lose the excess weight. I have managed to lose 60+lbs but can't maintain with healthy diet and exercise. Could permanent removal of those excess cells through Lipo help reduce the hormone imbalance, making it easier to lose or maintain weight?

Doctor Answers 5

Liposuction to treat PCOS

Dear fruitfly05,

PCOS has many variants. The signs and symptoms of PCOS range from hirsutism to body weight gain and hormonal and ovulatory irregularities.

Following the RPCOS with a certified endocrinologist and/or gynecologist is critical. The subcutaneous fat gain that can be associated with PCOS and other endocrine systems can respond to liposuction, however, the improvement will be in figure, shape and form, but not in decrease in the hormonal irregularities associated with the syndrome. Liposuction and PCOS just as in diabetes or patients with hypertension can improve contour and shape, but should not be viewed as a weight loss technique and certainly not one that would correct any hormonal imbalances.

I applaud you for your weight loss and attention to exercise and dietary management is critical and liposuction should be used only for shaping where necessary.

I hope this information is of some assistance and best of luck.

To find out more, please visit the link below.

R. Stephen Mulholland, M.D.
Certified Plastic Surgeon
Yorkville, Toronto


Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 88 reviews

PCOS and Liposuction

Liposuction would not help an internal complex problem related to the ovaries and hormones.  Just like liposuction is not a weight loss intervention and doesnt help high blood pressure or diabeties.  Good luck!  Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 176 reviews

Liposuction

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is directly related to the ovaries.  Liposuction will decrease the number of adipocytes but have no effect on the ovaries.

John Burns, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Liposuction for polycystic ovarian syndrome

Thank you for asking about your PCOS and liposuction.

  • There are several variants of PCOS - one is associated with excess weight.
  • PCOS can be treated - e.g. with metformin, birth control pills and other medication.
  • It is a complex hormonal disorder - I can find nothing suggesting that fat cells hormonal release is the cause of PCOS but perhaps that is the case.
  • Liposuction can remove fat cells in areas of weight gain. It changes proportions, but is not for weight loss.
  • You will find many stories of PCOS weight loss on Pinterest - you might some of them helpful.
  • It has been my observation that many women who are overweight and have PCOS are consuming too many calories often in the form of sodas and other drinks - or are drinking a lot of diet soda.
  • Diet soda is well known to disrupt insulin metabolism and make it harder to lose ewight.
Always see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Hope you find this information helpful. Best wishes.

PCOS

Thank you for your thoughtful question. I would say that it is important to remember that liposuction is not performed for weight loss. It can improve contour, but losing weight on the scale is not the goal. However, this improved appearance and waistline is often enough to "jump start" a healthy diet & exercise routine, and that could help stimulate weight loss and thus improve other medical conditions. Best wishes.

Paul J. Leahy, MD
Leawood Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.