What is this hard white piece that just came out of my breast opening? (photos)

Have this opening under my breast for about 3-4 wks - BL with BA, PS said it take time to heal & to wash/apply rx 2x daily w/ nonstick pad which I have. then this hard white edge appeared on bottom of wound & I assumed was skin Well today that hard piece came out! It is hard (plastic like?) and thick (def not thread) and it left two holes. I'm to see PS tomm morning but wanted to get other opinions! See pic with white edge still attached, white piece & wound showing the holes it left. Thanks

Doctor Answers 9

What is this hard white piece that just came out of my breast opening? (photos)

  1. My over the internet guess is a suture?? But best to ask your surgeon IN PERSON tomorrow.....

Open Vertical Incision Wound after Breast Lift with Implants


That whitish material looks like organized fibrin protein that would become a scab if allowed to dry.  It may be associated with some dissolvable suture material--most likely a material called Vicryl--- that is widely used in circumstances like these.  Once any of the foreign suture material is gone this area should heal pretty quickly, though it sometimes takes a while to get the healing to progress.  Tell your surgeon about it tomorrow, and best of luck.    

Best wishes,     

Tom DeWire, MD, FACS    

Richmond, VA

Thomas M. DeWire Sr., MD (retired)
Richmond Plastic Surgeon
4.3 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Hard plastic coming out of breast incision

Thank you for your question about your breast augmentation.

This is a partially absorbed 'suture' from a suture stapler.
Vicryl is often irritating when near the skin - it is not uncommon to have this happen.
Be sure your surgeon removes it tomorrow if it doesn't come out before your appointment.

Be sure to consult a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.
Hope this helps. Have a great day.

Insorb staple

This is a dissolving staple from an "insorb stapler." It is made of vicryl, a dissolvable suture material, SInce it is exposed, your surgeon will probably remove it tomorrow. 

Best wishes. 

Absorbable Sutures

It's not unusual for patients to encounter suture remnants following the combination of breast augmentation and breast lift surgery. These are typically absorbable sutures which are used to close the deeper tissue. Depending upon the type of suture used, they have usually dissolved within two to four weeks following surgery.

Occasionally, these sutures can persist, which can result in crusting and scabbing. Under these circumstances, they can be easily removed without structural consequences. Removal of these sutures should be performed by trained medical personnel to avoid injury to adjacent structures.

What is this hard white piece that just came out of my breast opening?

Dear Reader

Breast lifts involve multiple incisions that may occasionally open during the post operative period.  Normally, simple wound care is all that is necessary, and the would heals spontaneously.  The white firm material seems like suture material.  My best guess is probably an absorbable staple such as Insorb brand absorbable staples.  Please consult your surgeon.  Good luck and be safe.

John T. Nguyen, MD, FACS, FICS
Double Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

John Nguyen, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.7 out of 5 stars 71 reviews


Although it is difficult to say judging from photos alone, this may have been a piece of suture that came out. If there is any of this visibly remaining then you should have your surgeon remove it for you. Best of luck!

White thing

Looking at your photos, I would think that one of your stitches came out. Some of stitches can be somewhat hard and white.  However, discuss this with your surgeon.

Connie Hiers, MD
San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
4.6 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Appears to be a piece of a suture.

Thank you for your question. Appears to be a piece of a suture. In any case, if it has been removed your incision should start to heal faster. Discuss with your surgeon tomorrow.


Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.9 out of 5 stars 415 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.