Horrible Results from Juvederm Under Eye Injections!

About 7 months ago i had juvederm under eye...

about 7 months ago i had juvederm under eye injections. they have looked horrible from beginning to end. not only were they puffy like a little pillow, the pillow outlined the bags that were there to begin with. Now that the juvederm is starting to disapate, it is lumpy and the skin looks baggy.

nothing but cons to report. puffiness, bruising TO THIS DAY, they tried to "fix" it in the begining with thermage? what a joke!

Is a law suit applicable here? if there is anything i can do, i certainly don't want to go back to the same doctor! Of course after the fact i heard negative reports about him. DO YOUR RESEARCH BEFORE YOU GO! What was I thinking :-(

will my eyes go back to "normal" once the juvederm is all disolved? or will i now have stretched out baggy skin under my eyes? soooooo frustrated and sad!!!
Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon

he is horrible, tried to fix it with thermage, didn't refund ANYTHING even after they realized how bad it was. Also continued to recommend face lifts. I'm 38 years old and look pretty darn good! Even his nurse and partner told me later that an idea of a facelift would be rediculous for me.

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I had juvederm in my cheek and it ruined my face. I have big dent, hollow under my eyes and in lower face. Look 15 years older and deformed. What they dont tell you is that when your face swells youre skin stravhes and when swelling is gone youare left with saggy droopy skin. They injure your nerves and muscle with needles and your own tissue gets weak and dies pver time , you see more hollow and droopiness. but they say youre gonna look like the way you were before in worst case! Dont believe this trash at all. They say your body produce collagan due to injection , No its scar tissue but they want your money
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The bags he put in my eyes in 2008 are still there, and it is now 2012. I would say after a while you may need to find a competent practitioner who can gently remove it properly.
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Hi,in 2009 i made the huuuuge mistake to use hyaluronic acid under my eyes...(i don't remember the brand,but it was a soft filler not permanent)...now in 2012 i STILL have bags under my eyes and a dark grey color...i really don't know what to do anymore..im so sad,and even if i put make up or consealer i cannot cover it! i went from doctor to doctor but nobody can help me....some of them suggested hyaluronidace but none of them is confident to do it because there is a risk there as well...im helpless...ANY advise?thanks
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So sorry to hear what you have been dealing with for the past 3 years. I'm glad you decided to consult with some other doctors to get some opinions. Do you happen to know what kind of doctors you saw? I would suggest getting opinions from board certified plastic surgeons and dermatologists. I would think they would be confident in the use of hyaluronidase, if that is the appropriate treatment for you.

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I would like to know if you still have problems with juvederm under your eyes.

I did it 2 months ago and I'm a bit scared cause every morning I wake up with bags under my eyes. Thanks for your time!!
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I had Juvederm Ultra injected under my eyes exactly three weeks ago. Yesterday they still looked so bad I thought I was going to have a meltdown. I was sure I had Tyndall effect, overfill, every possible bad outcome. I have read every horror story on every chat board about this procedure (wish I had done that first!!) But on this board I found someone who said to put warm/hot compresses and arnica gel under the eyes, and today I'm not kidding they look a thousand times better. Now I can see that what I had was serious bruising and swelling. You keep hearing that bruising will be gone in two weeks max, NOT TRUE, neither will swelling in many people! It could be six weeks or more! To those dealing with this problem right now, wait it out... because what I desperately wanted to keep was the fullness under my eyes as opposed to the deep hollows I had which caused me to get Juvederm in the first place. Also, once the Juvederm is in there, your own collagen begins to form and help that wrinkly skin around your eyes stay young looking! So you don't want to rush and get it out with hyaluronidase unless you absolutely have to. Try to have patience and use the hot compresses and the arnica gel! My eyes are still not perfect but now after three weeks I finally see progress in a good direction, and I'm not embarrassed to be seen without sunglasses! Trust me I looked as bad or worse than any of the photos I've seen of Tyndall effect, etc. IT WILL GET BETTER, HANG IN THERE!
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I have horrible darkness and lumps like Lurch from Adams Family. Were your results like that? I am praying this goes away!!!!
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How much did he put in, do you know?
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I would like to know the provider name. Thanks!
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The doctor's name and contact info are shown at the top of the review. Hope this helps!

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Thankyou! You have been very kind and helpful. What would you say to the other Dr. if I were to go in and ask for a refund? I mean as one human being to another-he certainly knew he was wrong -starting a new practice in a very financially depressed area and needed the money I believe. I wonder if he would refund me without going through the legal stuff-I hope he learned from this. It's amazing how your appearance can effect your life. Your advice is helping people. Thanks again.
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As one person to another, I'd really want to know 1. where he got his training, 2. how long ago 3. how many people he has actually done a liquid facelift on. Then I would let him know I felt abandoned as a patient, and was devasted and angry that I had to go elsewhere to get the problems HE caused, fixed at MY further expense. I would let him know my problem wasn't a reaction to the filler, it was a reaction to the fact that he didn't seem to know how to administer it properly, and that this was corroborated by the practitioner that fixed my face back to baseline. I'd let him know I felt he was unqualified to do this type of treatment, both by the results, and by the fact that he was not able to fix his mistakes with my face. I would let him know the first rule of medicine was DO NO HARM, and that he broke that rule. I'd tell him he needed more training for sophisticated things like a liquid facelift, and that my research has shown me that his use of the product was not industry standard, as they use sculptra and radiesse for such things. I would also say that for these reasons, I would like my money back. I would let him know that I would be letting the Board of Medical Examiners know how I felt about all of this. (and I would, too!) I would really have a difficult time having a civil conversation with a guy like this to tell the truth. You know he is going to be defensive, or patronizing, or simply condescend to your intelligence, as though you don't know what you are talking about and you are a hysterical female exaggerating your claims, and then he'll probably walk out of the room. My advice stands to bring a friend or three with you for this conversation and request for your money back. Maybe a letter about your face from the 2nd practitioner about the condition you were in wen she saw you---overfilling in the cheeks, the number of units of enzyme she had to use to get rid of the filler, etc.----or maybe just a copy of your medical records from the practitioner who helped you would be sufficient to present to this guy at your meeting. Again, bring friends as witnesses to how he reacts and responds to your questions. Maybe my parting shot would be that money in the short-term at the expense of your patients' well being and satisfaction will lose you huge money in the long term, either by a lawsuit or by damage to his reputation and lost business. I would remind him that it is a small world, and word of mouth can easily and quickly break a business.
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I would also like to mention that in almost every study of post precedure complications regarding Juvederm, Sculptra (PLLA) and other injectables, it is RARELY a reaction to the product, but the injection techniques of the practitioner(and with Sculptra, the volume of reconstitution of the product) that has caused post-procedure complications. Especially with Sculptra. Reactions to Juvederm are statistically VERY VERY rare. Dissatifaction comes from inexperienced practitioners, not the product. There are documented cases of a suspected reaction to hyaluronic acid products in some patients, and that of course isn't the practitioner's fault. These reactions are so rare in fact, that pre-injection allergy testing (as they did with collagen) is not seen as medically necessary with these newer fillers. "Te" mentioned that it is not the practitioner's fault that your body may react a certain way to an injectable. She is correct, but I wanted to mention that these reactions to PRODUCT are extremely rare, and it is unlikely that this is what happened. The reactions to injection site trauma, such as lymphedema from an occluded lymph system, hematomas, vascular occlusions (injecting into a vein and not having the appropriate hyaluronidase or nitro paste to dilate the vessel or remove it from the vein), and actual skin necrosis (skin death from over-injecting the vein and not fixing it imediately) ARE the fault of the practitioner ALONE. When a practitioner has to use hylauronidase to correct overfilling, it tells me that they didn't know what in the hell they were doing. Period. Then, when these practitioners use the enzyme to degrade the product, they end up leaving their clients looking like hags because the product WILL remove your natural hyaluronic acid from your face---that is its medical purpose. Your body should replenish this, but it doesn't always do it back to baseline, and people feel as though they look sick and worse than before. And they probably do. In reality, they need to get their tear troughs filled again--but probably won't after their experiences with unscrupulous practitioners. I have never had to use an enzyme to degrade a clients product, because it IS your face, and I do NOT want to mess up the first thing that people see. Your face defines your self-esteem. Other don't feel this way--they want the quick profits. Injection technique is one of the most IMPORTANT things to know with these fillers. Lack of proper experience or training, and failure of the practitioner to disclose this limited ability is a definite malpractice red flag for me. When I started, I started on friends, explained my training AND lack of experience to them, let them know all the risks, and followed injection techniques absolutely by the book. I filled very conservatively, and still do, with excellent results, according to my clients. I have hours of CME's on various filler injection techniques, and as a nurse, have given more injections of medications than most doctors have in their lifetimes-----but I have been a nurse for 5 years. If one of my patients developed a hematoma under her eye for example, I would have immediately had her come into my office to assess her condition. I would have requested steroids from my Consulting Medical Director, provided an ice gel pack, given her written instructions for care, and scheduled a follow-up in a week to assess the swelling and to see if there was a need for further treatment. Because I took swift action and introduced appropriate interventions, and basically showed that I cared about my patient, my liability would have been significantly DECREASED. I also wouldn't have charged her for any of this. No one could say that I didn't attempt to assist my patient with a post-procedure complication. This is the part that is missing from all of these stories. The other part that is missing is the practitioner owning up to his mistake and knowing how to correct it---all of which I have no problem with. For the liquid facelift--that was a ridiculous misuse of a product--juvederm is NOT for volume filling of the planes of the face. Only for lines. He REALLY screwed up, in my opinion, and then to charge for ANYTHING is just stupid and poor practice.
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Tried to make an appointment with Dr. who screwed me up-"On vacation till Dec.1"-Have not contacted an attorney yet. I thought I would request all my money back-with friend in tow as he is hard to deal with. I could hardly stand to look in the mirror any more so went in yesterday to Dr. at medi spa who agreed to have a look. She was appalled-said as you did on placement of filler-could not get over the amount in cheeks-also agreed with me on filler lumps under eyes. Removed more product,and I finally look like me again-family amazed. Made a comment on how she could actually feel the filler in my cheek as she put the needle in. Less than 1cc whole face and almost all gone-under eyes also. Are you sure enzyme degrades natural facial collegen? I have not noticed. Use lots of supplements and quite healthy-does it stay in system more than 48 hours? I hoped there was so much filler in my face it would go after that-not my own. Could not live with this stuff another moment-that was the 5th(and last time) and the only one that worked. hope my face will be ok.
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Hi Mishka, Yes, the hyaluronidase will degrade some of your natural hylauronic acid in the absence of a filler product. Remember, this is what the product is supposed to do, in order to allow medications to infiltrate the skin matrix more quickly. That is the medical use of hyaluronidase. But of course we now use it to get rid of excess fillers as well. But if the concentration of the enzyme was appropriate, and it sounds as though it was, it will mostly degrade the filler, as the enzymatic action of the product does not act indefinitely. In other words, if I injected you with hyaluronidase and you had no filler in your skin, I would degrade some of the natural hyaluronic acid in your skin, because that is what hyaluronidase does. But because you have an EXCESS of HA in your skin, the enzymatic action will degrade that, and you will be back to baseline pre-HA filler. Make sense? I hope so. Regardless, I am SO GLAD you feel better about yourself now! And I am very glad you found someone to help you. Keep her bill and request that your other practitioner refund you. Ask the new practitioner if she would attest to your medical condition, as you are contemplating writing a letter to the Board of Medical Examiners and would like her to be your 2nd opinion. It couldn't hurt! I hope that you get your money back. It is the least that you deserve. I know that your former injector was incompetent. The fact that it took a competent practitioner very little time and effort to reverse your problem is proof of that to me. Good luck with everything again, and I am so relieved for you!
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Lissanna, I wasn't talking about an allergic reaction. I was talking about subltle inflammatory reactions - some people simply have these more than others, and these are not reactions that you can predict. Some people are prone to inflammatory reactions, some people's bodies take forever to heal, and some people have autoimmune problems where any foreign substance illicits a problematic inflammatory response in the body.
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Hi Te, Because these products are made with the components already in our bodies, reactions of any sort are extremely rare. If you are intimating that you were referencing a person with an established autoimmmune disorder, I did not get that from your post. People in general are not prone to subtle imflammatory reactions without injury to the body, underlying morbidity such as lupus, or introduction of a foreign substance that evokes an antigenic response. In filler cases, it is usually a practitioner screw up. Also, these cases should have very little trauma, and therfore almost no healing or "down" time. Healing shouldn't take "forever" because it should be extremely minor trauma to begin with.
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Please tell me where you are located so that I can come to you!! :)
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Lissanna, what can I do if my juvederm was put in my tear trough areas more than 1.5 years ago and there are still greyish "ridges" under my eyes. The doctor says there is no product there anymore so I can't use anything to reverse this. I am wondering though whether I will ever look right again and what I can do with my soft puffy ridges that will make them go away? Any help would be appreciated.
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It has become quite apparent to me that many of the doctors really do not know what they are talking about (especially when you listen to them opposing information such as "Vitrase does not dissolve native tissue" vs "Vitrase does dissolve native tissue!"). Juvederm and vitrase off-label have not been around long enough for anyone to really make any firm assessment. As of now, it is a crap-shoot. We are the guinea pigs and we must figure this out for ourselves firsthand. Now, after 2 years (this month) I still have Juve (or something) under my eye. Where it was injected, it is still there. It could be Juve, or it could be collagen formation around the Juve scaffold that was there. But I think for some people, Juve lasts a lot longer then many proffessionals think it does. I feel people metabolize it differently. I am pharmacology PhD candiate, and we already know that genetic differences cause people to metabolize drugs differently (some very fast, some very slow, but most have an "average" metabolism), so why would Juve metabolism be any different? Thus Anonsr, it could be Juve that is still under your eyes. It is very possible.
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I almost died as a result of Juvaderm Voluma XC injection because it has lidocaine in the product. It got into my bloodstream and passed the brain/blood barrier. It led to confusion,tremors and unconsciousness with agonal breathing Made my BP go sky high and then tachycardia. Lucky I did not die
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I agree with Te about "Why Me 99" going to NYC to find a plastic surgeon to assess her face. I doubt there will be a class action lawsuit, because as Te implied, this appears to be a practitioner problem and not a product problem. Class actions are brought about because of dangerous medications that pose a large public health risk, which Juvederm does not. Most malpractice lawsuits are settled out of court, as it is less costly to the insurance carrier and the physician. That's why I suggest using an attorney and attorney's letterhead for letters requesting both assistance from the Board of Medical Examiners and a direct request from the physician to refund the money. My husband is an Internal Medicine Physician, so believe me--I know whereof I speak. Thankfully he has never been sued. And it doesn't matter what or how many disclosures you have signed if you find that the doctor did not have the adequate training to perform the injections, or mislead you about his experience. So try to find out what kind of training this doc had, and how many patients he has performed this type of procedure on. Call his office and pretend to be someone interested in scheduling an appointment, and ask those questions. His office should be happy to tell you. I don't know what the gray area under your eye could be. I have seen bluish discolorations around the lips of patients who have been injected and have had a blod vessel burst, but never gray areas under the eyes post-injection. I disagree with Te however, when she states that "poor injection technique isn't malpractice." It can be construed as such by a jury of your peers if they find that the doctor misrepresented his ability to perform the procedure, and as such caused harm to the patient, that resulted in injury. Did the practitioner provide a reasonable standard of care? If he is CHARGING you to fix a problem, that he caused by not knowing how to inject product properly, or by misusing the product (off label), or by failing to refer you to someone who COULD have assisted you, I do not feel that he has provided a resonable standard of care. I am a reasonable person, and I would NEVER leave a patient wondering where to go for assistance. Ever. Please get a second opinion in New york City and see what can be done. Unless you do this, you will not win any suit, because you need to show a court that you did everything reasonably possible to resolve this as well without resorting to legal intervention. Good luck, and remember that YOU are your best advocate when it comes to medical care. Don't ever let a Dr. or nurse push you around.
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I wish I could help you, and I'm sorry you're dealing with this. :( I said "multiple disclosures" arbitrarily. Maybe the one disclosure you signed contained all of the necessary liability information - I don't know - I can't speak to that. The bottom line is though, NO cosmetic procedures are without their own inherent risks. It is up to the consumer to know and understand all of the risks before having these procedures done. Now, if there was blatant negligence on the part of the doctor, that's a different story. Poor injection technique isn't negligence. Also, when a patient reacts poorly to a procedure, that's not really the doctor's fault. The thing about it is, you just never know how your body is going to react to something until you do it. I have tear troughs and volume loss around my eyes that is very distressing to me, and I've been researching hyaluronic injectibles for months now, and am not sure I am ever going to do it simply because of stories like yours - I'm not sure it's worth the risk. If I were in your situation, I guess I'd call around to some prominent surgeons in the New York City area to see if anyone has any recommendations for your situation. Best of luck to you - I hope it resolves.
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I’m sorry but I do not agree. A Plastic Surgeon should know how to inject a product of any kind into a patience face. If there is a risk that should be shared with the patient in entirety or perhaps some prior testing to insure there is not going to be a problem. I was told slight swelling and some redness in the injection site. His words were “you’ll love it”. I trusted the product and in the Doctor. Why wouldn’t I? Eight months, and I’m still a mess. In the research I have done, I am convinced this Doctor ether put too much juvederm in or injected me improperly. Do I blame him? Absolutely. If you can’t do the job correctly, you should be there. My God, you are talking about a person face. Do you know what it’s like to have people look at you and say, “Wow, have you been ill”? Do yourself a big favor, do your homework on Plastic Surgery, there nowhere to turn when something goes wrong
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