'Sloshing' Since the Day of my Surgery Last Week. How Soon Does That Go Away?

I had 250cc high profile Mentor silicone gel implants placed submuscular less than a week ago. Since the day of surgery, I've had sloshing noises from both breasts. My doctor saw me yesterday and said that there is nothing to worry about and that it is not dangerous. I'm just concerned that the sounds will remain long term. Typically, how long until the noises go away? I'm a little embarrassed to move my arms around my fiancé.

Doctor Answers (9)

Sloshing After Breast Augmentation

+3

The sloshing sound you hear after a breast augmentation is because air was allowed to get in through the incision through which your breast implant was placed.  Also, in the process of preparing your breast pocket for implantation, your surgeon places saline and other liquids into the pocket which are not completely removed.  A combination of air and liquid in your breast pocket along with the implant, in some patients, leads to a sloshing sound.  Both the air and the fluid will be reabsorbed by your body over the first couple weeks after surgery. 

The sounds you hear are completely normal and nothing to worry about.


Honolulu Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 200 reviews

Noises in breasts after breast implants

+3

"Sloshing" or other noises coming from the breasts after breast implant surgery is quite common because air gets into the pocket during surgery.  It can take about a month for this to disappear.  You have nothing to worry about.

Bruce Genter, MD
Abington Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

'Sloshing' Since the Day of my Surgery Last Week. How Soon Does That Go Away?

+1

This is quite common and typically lasts 7-10 days but may persist up to 3 weeks. Beyond this you may want to consider an ultrasound for seroma

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

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This is not common

+1
The sloshing noise is very common for saline implants but not silicone gel implants. The concern is seroma formation around the implant and then changing into capsular contracture. If not resolved in two week, you may need to have ultrasound directed drainage and drain placement.

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
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Sloshing noise heard from breast implants placed 1 week previously

+1

A sloshing sound associated with recently placed breast implants is not uncommon. It can be a combination of some fluid around the implant in addition to some air in the pocket. Typically, this will resolve within a few weeks. Be patient.

Steven Turkeltaub, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

'Sloshing' Since the Day of my Surgery Last Week. How Soon Does That Go Away?

+1

In most cases a few weeks but there are exceptions. Follow your chosen PS advise. From MIAMI DR. Darryl J. Blinski

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Sloshing around silicone gel breast implants

+1

Sloshing or noises after breast augmentation with a silicone gel implant are caused by fluid within the pocket, and a breast pocket which is larger than the implant, often the case with high profile implants and the more narrow diameter or 'foot print'. The fluid is caused by the inflammation of healing and will go away in a week or two. Some surgeons prefer a larger pocket and encourage massage of the implant so that it will move under the breast. We prefer that the implant and pocket fit as one and would suggest a snug bra until the sloshing stops.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Sloshing arounf breast implants early postop is normal

+1

Almost all patients experience some weird fluid sounds around an implant in the first few postop weeks.  These always go away.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Sloshing noise

+1

A sloshing noise one week after breast augmentation may represent some fluid that has remained in the pocket. Often it gets resorbed.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.