Breast Implant Removal and Lift - Should I Lose Weight First?

I have had 650cc breast implants put in when my breasts were a saggy b cup and i weighed 150 lbs. I went through another preganancy last year and gained 25 lbs. I want to get a lift and implant removal. I want to lose 50 pounds. Should I get the removal and the lift after I lose the weight? In two seperate operations?

Doctor Answers (14)

Breast Implant Removal and Lift - Should I Lose Weight First?

+3

Regarding: "Breast Implant Removal and Lift - Should I Lose Weight First?
I have had 650cc breast implants put in when my breasts were a saggy b cup and i weighed 150 lbs. I went through another preganancy last year and gained 25 lbs. I want to get a lift and implant removal. I want to lose 50 pounds. Should I get the removal and the lift after I lose the weight? In two seperate operations
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As I understand your question you are 175 pounds and would like to weigh 125 pounds, or 25 pounds less than what you weighed before you had these large implants put in.

For the best results, you need to be at your normal (non over weight  weight) for 6 months before you have a breast lift. Doing a breast implant removal in one sitting and the breast lift in a second IS safer than doing it in the same operation. If you want to play it safe, you can remove your implants now THEN wait at least 6 months in which you can stabilize your weight and then have a Breast Lift when you reached and maintained your ideal weight for 6 months.

Dr. Peter Aldea


Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Weight loss and implants

+2

I would recommend losing the weight first before udnergoing any breast surgery.  The breasts will certainly lose some volume with weight loss.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Breast implant removal/lift and weight loss?

+1

Yes you should definitely lose weight 1st before having the procedure. This course of action will maximize the chances of optimal results and minimize  the chances that further surgery may be necessary. I think the procedures, with some exceptions, can be done safely in one stage.

What your breasts will look like after explantation  depends on several factors such as: the quality of skin elasticity (the better the elasticity the better the skin will bounce back),  the size of the implants used (the larger the implant the more trouble you may have with redundant skin), and the amount of breast tissue present at this time (which may have changed since the time of your breast augmentation). 
Life experience since your breast augmentation procedure, such as pregnancy or weight gain weight loss, will  potentially influence the factors discussed above. If you take these factors into consideration and apply them  to your specific circumstances you may get a good idea of what to expect after the implants are removed.


Please make sure you're working with a well experienced board-certified plastic surgeon.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 707 reviews

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Losing weight and cosmetic surgery

+1

50 pounds is a lot of weight and your breasts may sag more.  Therefore, I would wait until all of the weight is lost before pursuing cosmetic breast surgery.

Jeffrey E. Schreiber, MD, FACS
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
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Weight loss before breast lift / explantation

+1

Your plan to lose 50 pounds is admirable.  This weight loss will significantly change the size and shape of your breasts.  It's best to wait until your weight is stable, so that you and your surgeon can make a plan based on a breast shape & size that has also stabilized.

It may be that you either downsize the implants or remove the implant altogether, and get a lift - this could all be done at the same time.  

 

Best wishes!

Thomas Fiala, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Best to lose weight before breast implant removal

+1

A significant weight loss of say, 50 pounds will impact the fullness of the breast and the degree of breast droop. If you can, lose the weight first and then have your breast implants removed, with a breast lift in one step.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Implant removal and lift after weight loss

+1

If you are planning on losing 50 lbs then lose them prior to an explant mastopexy (implant removal and lift).  Don't start smoking and you can certainly have the lift and removal of implants in one operation.  Best wishes

Ricardo A. Meade, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

You should lose the desired amount of weight prior to cosmetic surgery

+1

Your weight should be stable for several months prior to having surgical procedures done that involve the skin.  You would like to have the skin tighten as much as possible prior to any other procedures.

Robert Whitfield, MD, FACS
Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Should weight be lost prior to implant removal and lift?

+1

If you are planning to lose 50 pounds, you definitely should lose the weight first.  The implant removal and breast lift can then be done in one stage. 

Kenneth L. Stein, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Lose weight before you have breast surgery.

+1

If you are planning on losing weight, it is best to achieve your weight goal prior to undergoing any surgery. There are multiple reasons for this:

  • Surgery is more predictable as the results will not be disrupted by further weight loss
  • Anesthesia and surgery is safer when you are at a normal weight
  • The changes in your breasts after weight loss may change your decision on what you wish to have done or eliminate the need for surgery altogether.

David Bogue, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.