Scar Tissue After Breast Implant Explantation

I am 8 weeks post explantation and my surgeon said my scars (under the breasts) are thick and firm and are attached to my tissues underneath. He's advised me to massage them firmly and that he may need to perform surgery to separate the tissue? What does this mean and what are the consequences of not having surgery. Is it likely that massaging will 'loosen' up the scar tissue?

Doctor Answers 9

I would overall advice you to let the area fully settled prior to having any further treatment.

Your surgeon is right that a massage does loosen some scar tissue in some cases but not in all.

It's not clear why you had your breast implants removed and whether the scarring is in proportion to your breast.

Overall, I will expect this situation to improve slightly but it's difficult to say to exactly to what extent.

I would overall advice you to let the area fully settled prior to having any further treatment.

Best wishes yours sincerely,

Adrian Richards
Plastic and Cosmetic Surgeon
Surgical Director of Aurora Clinics

Firm scar tissue after explantation

Massage may loosen up the scar tissue but time is usaully your best friend. Give it at least 6-9 months before making any longterm surgical . Surgical release is required at a later date if the scar doesn't release.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Massage does assist scar maturation

Many scars do respond to massage, so be sure to be diligent about doing massage on your tethered scars.  Time and massage will both help. If you need a scar revision, it sounds like your surgeon would be able and willing to do one.

Carmen Kavali, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Expalntation of breast implant

Explantation of breast implant can result in multitude of potential deformities including scarring and adhesions, that you are describing. You are very early post operatively. Start  the massage , and weight at least 6 months before doing any revision.

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Wound Healing Is A Dynamic Process-- Allow 12 Months

It’s important to realize that wound healing is a dynamic process and that you may not see your final results for at least a year following surgery.We frequently see wounds that are unattractive in the initial phases of wound healing which ultimately look good with the passage of time.Many of these wounds are similar to yours.They have firmness, redness, and are adherent to the deeper structures.

In the early post-operative period, massage, topical agents, and sun avoidance can all be utilized to minimize scarring.Occasionally, treatment with lasers may also be helpful.If scarring persists for longer than a year, surgical revision may be necessary.

It’s important to realize that scarring tends to improve over the course of approximately a year.In the vast majority of patients, surgical revisions aren’t necessary.It’s therefore important to be patient and listen to your surgeons recommendations.

Scars after breast surgery

Massaging is a great way to help with healing.  I would wait about 6 months before performing any scar revisions, but it's difficult to give you an exact answer without actually seeing you.

Scars ast 8 weeks

Usually scars at 6-8 weeks are the firmest and often reddest. It usually improves with time. Every surgeon offers different routines for scar management. Follow your doctor's advice.

Steven Wallach, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Scar Tissue after explantation

Generally, scars will take at least 6mo. or more to mature.  Conservative measures such as massage and silicone scar products are your best bet for now .  I would definitely delay  further surgery and reevaluate in 6months.

Stephen Delia, MD
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Scar Management after Breast Implant Removal?

You may be surprised how massage and “tincture of time” will improve the appearance and feel of the scarred tissue.

Best wishes.

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.