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Shaving off 8mm to 1cm from Bone Possible in Rhinoplasty?

I feel that my nose is too fat for my face and doesn't look right. It seems to extend too far off my face and I was wondering whether it would be possible to shave 8mm to 1cm off it in all areas (i.e from bridge to tip) to bring it closer to my face during the Rhinoplasty surgery. The nose bridge basically seems to be too high. Thanks in advance.

Doctor Answers (12)

Almost categorically no.

+1

Nose size means skin volume.  If your nose is reduced by 8-10 mm, all that skin has to go somewhere without distorting--something that is virtually impossible. 

 

Many things make a nose look large--radix height, tip projection, nasal skin type, and so on.  A capable rhinoplasty surgeon can separate these components for you and help guide you toward your surgical goal with a strategy that is safe and will work.


Nashua Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Typically 4-6mm is removed during rhinoplasty

+1

Eight millimeters to one centimeter is maybe too aggressive of a reduction in a rhinoplasty procedure. Four to six millimeters is more the amount removed during the rhinoplasty. This is both bone and cartilage reduction and sculpting to give a new refinement to the nose.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Reducing Nasal Projection

+1

Reducing the bony projection 8-10 can be done. However, "proportion" is the operative word (no pun intended) in rhinoplasty surgery. There must be proportion between the nose and the rest of the face , as well as a good relationship between the various parts of the nose. You want to achieve an aesthetically pleasing nose, not just a smaller one.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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One cm of bone reduction during Rhinoplasty is on the extreme side

+1

One cm of reduction is on the extreme side and you really probably don't need to take that much off when you undergo rhinoplasty (or nose job / nose shaping / nose reshaping / nose cosmetic surgery / nose plastic surgery). What might bring your nose into balance is lifting up the tip of your nose and placing a graft in between the eyes to offset what you are feeling is a big hump of a nose. The only way to tell is to look at you in person or through some well taken photographs. Your nose can be made to look like what you want to a significant degree.

Remember, nothing is magic but we, as doctors, are trying to make it look as though it were magic.

Philip Young, MD
Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Consultation with Digital Imaging is a Great Idea

+1

I must agree with the other surgeons - taking 1cm off the nasal dorsum seems rather much. I would suggest visiting a facial plastic surgeon or plastic surgeon who performs digital imaging. The surgeon can then sit down and illustrate what may need to be done to achieve the goals you desire. In some cases, removing bone is necessary while in others, actually adding bone is what is needed to achieve your desired result.

D.J. Verret, MD
Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

A large proboscis

+1

Newts,

It sounds like a reasonable plan, but also sounds like a lot of nose to remove.  I recommend consulting with a plastic surgeon for some guidance as to how much overprojection of your nose can be corrected.  Good luck!

Kenneth R. Francis, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

How much to bring down a nose

+1

Dear Newts

Taking down the bump on a nose varies patient to patient. I must admit that it does sound like a lot 1 cm. It may appear this way to you but sometimes taking less off the bump and building up the bridge gives a much nicer look.

See a plastic surgeon who does a good deal of noses both open and closed. Have him evaluate you on a computer to show you how you would look with the "new" nose and discuss your desires with him. You may need to see several doctors before making your final decision.

Good Luck.

Steven Schuster, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

See a rhinoplasty specialist.

+1

 It is possible to make your nose smaller in all dimensions. It is important to see an experienced rhinoplasty specialist to evaluate your skin thickness as well as facial proportions.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Shaving down a large nasal hump

+1

Yes it can be achieved. However 1 cm seems to be too much. Look at your profile view and make sure you don't have a small chin. A  small chin can make your nose look bigger than it really is.

Also, reducing the nasal hump too much is more likely to lead to complications than a conservative reduction.

Regards

Tanveer Janjua, MD
Bedminster Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Rhinoplasty reduction

+1

Newts UK, the amount of reduction performed on your nose really depends on a number of factors. One of the most important considerations is your skin type. If you have thick skin, there is a limit to how much your nose will 'shrink wrap' down following reduction of the underlying bone and cartilage. Thinner skin tends to shrink down more readily and is more favorable when looking to make the nose smaller in size. If you are able to reduce the nose by 8-10 mm from bridge to tip will ultimately depend on whether or not the final size is proportional for your face. This determination is best made through careful nasal analysis done by an experience rhinoplasty surgeon. The link below may be helpful in better understanding what goes into this type of analysis. It would be beneficial for you to undergo a personal examination followed by computer imaging of your nose to determine what would be the ideal direction and degree of change.

John M. Hilinski, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.