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What Percentage of the Time is a Nerve Hit During Ulthera Treatment?

How often is a nerve hit during Ulthera? I heard of a staff member in a doctor's office who's cheek was numb for a few months after having Ulthera. Are nerves and muscles damaged during an Ulthera treatment. Is it just collegen material that is damages and if so how is the treatment limited to just effecting (heating up/burning)collegen and leaving muscle tissue and nerves unaffected by the extreme heat?

Doctor Answers (2)

Numbness is rare after Ultherapy

+1

nerve injury, although possible, with Ultherapy is very rare. Nerves traverse in different planes and they can be subject in a few areas to the heat generated by the ultrasound energy used in ultherapy. Sensivitivy, numbness and weakness of muscles controlled by a nerve are risks of the procedure, but I am not aware of any permanent complications. We have been informed by the company that these issues, to-date, have spontaneously recovered.


Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

What structures can be injured by Ultherapy

+1

Ultherapy is focused ultrasonic energy.  I point about 1mm is treated at a very specific distance beneath this skin.  There are other structures under the skin that can be affected.  Blood vessels, nerves, muscles and salivary glands.  It is very rare to have a significant injury to any of these structures.  Hitting a vessel can cause a bruise. Hitting a nerve can cause temporary numbness (the superficial nerves will recover). Hitting muscles and salivary glands don't have any significant side effects, since the spot of injury is so small.  In my practice I have never seen anything more significant than temporary numbness and small bruises.  Both of which are exceptionally rare.

Leif L. Rogers, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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