Does Re-opening Incision Make Scar Worse?

I am 23 years old and I am looking to explant ASAP. My BA was a little over 2 weeks ago, and I've gotten the lecture on the whole "wait it out, you'll change your mind". I realized too late I did not get a BA for the right reasons, and it was not the quick fix to my self esteem. I want to explant and work on loving my natural God-given body. My scars are already fading nicely, & my question is...will reopening the incision make the scar worse later?

Doctor Answers (3)

Two weeks too early to make a decision about X plantation after breast augmentation.

+1

I really don't think you should explant the implants this early. Nevertheless if you choose to do so long-term results of the scar will be no different.


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Healing after an explanation

+1

If you are determine to have the implants removed then going through  your old incision will not make it worse.  It will heal up about the same as now.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Does Re-opening Incision Make Scar Worse?

+1

Dear Theoldme2,

I think I already gave you one of those 'lectures' before so I won't do that now. =)

As a direct answer to your question, no, this will not make scars worse long term.  When I re-open a breast for whatever reason, (usually to change to a bigger implant) I excise the scar, not just cut through it again.  If a surgeon simply opens a scar, then there is a potential to make it wider, but if it is 'cut out', then you are starting from scratch again. Scars will get worse before they get better and you have not experienced this yet as you are still early in the healing process.  Expect the normal healing scar to get hard and a bit red at about 3 months, then gradually fade and soften over a year.

Best Wishes,

Pablo Prichard, MD

Pablo Prichard, MD
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

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