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Is it Wrong to Try and Negotiate a Slightly Lower Price for Surgery?

i've been to my cosmetic doctor 3 times. i've referred 4 people to him for major body makeovers. I want to go back to him for a tummy tuck but his cost is a little high. i don't want to go anywhere else. Is it still wrong for me to ask him for a better price? To make it a little more affordable for me?

Doctor Answers (18)

Negotiating price

+1
Patients negotiate price all the time,  there may be the opportunity to get a better price if you plan or gave the surgery on short notice by taking an unexpected cancellation.  I always give prior patients a discount especially if they have referred other oatients to me, but not plastic surgeons are as generous.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Rewards program very common

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Prices vary by geography but in Florida it can be between $5500-$8000. Factors such as surgeon, anesthesia, and facility cost play a factor. You lose nothing by asking for a price reduction. In my practice we always give special consideration to people who refer other patients. I practice with a dermatologist so our rewards program includes rewards from both specialties. 

Raj S. Ambay, MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Should Returning Patient Ask For A Lower Fee

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I agree that it's okay to ask for a reduction in fee when you've been a happy patient and have referred others. At my practice, we have a referral program which rewards patients for referring friends and family that also have surgery with us. My patients are encouraged to discuss fees, payment plans, etc. with their Patient Coordinator. We listen carefully to our patients. My Business Manager handles many routine requests, and will relay any special circumstances for my consideration. I love when my patients return for additional procedures and when they refer friends, family and co-workers too, as it is the ultimate "thank you"! 

Robert N. Young, MD, FACS
San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 40 reviews

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Is it Wrong to Try and Negotiate a Slightly Lower Price for Surgery?Answer:

+1

Never hurts to ask! I know in my practice we have a reward program for referring patients (that actually schedule!!!). But I would run it by the office manager, rather than the doctor..then if you don't get the answer you want...move to the doctor!!!!!!!!!

John J. Corey, MD
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Negotiating a reduction in cosmetic surgical fee

+1

Your question is an excellent one and a quite reasonable one. Given that you have had previous surgical procedures with him and have referred several patients, your request is quite reasonable. It would be both the right thing to do as well as good business sense for him to offer you a significant break on your desired surgical procedure. This would be a win-win for the both of you. 

Steven Turkeltaub, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Negotiate Prices for Plastic Surgery?

+1

I think you will find the most plastic surgeons will not be offended ( and are probably used to it anyway) by patients requesting lower costs of surgery.  You may very well be pleasantly surprised since you are an excellent referral source for the practice.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 781 reviews

The art of negotiation.

+1

Many patients ask for a discount and say that they will refer patients to you if you give them a discount. If you can show that you truly are the reason for these four  patients came to the doctor he or she would probable consider a discount of some amount.

Walter D. Gracia, MD
Arlington Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Would not hurt to ask

+1

I do not think it would rude to ask and you may be pleased with the answer.  You sound like you are an excellent referral source.

Vishnu Rumalla, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 83 reviews

Negotiating with your plastic surgeon

+1

As a consumer, I tend to take prices at their face.  My wife is exactly the opposite and won't hesitate to ask for a reduction.  So, my comment is that I don't think it's unreasonable to inquire whether the plastic surgeon can do a little better.  If a patient offers me 50 cents on the dollar, that's another story.  It feels insulting and I don't think it's unreasonable for us, as physicians with many, many years of training, to expect to be paid appropriately for our services.  It is my policy to reduce fees, sometimes significantly, for repeat customers and particularly those who have referred other patients to me.  That said, I don't reduce fees for a new patient who promises that she will send all her friends because those promises are, well, just promises.  I suggest that you ask your plastic surgeon what is going into his price.  It may be that he uses a board certified anesthesiologist whereas other doctors have nurse anesthetists at a lower price.  He may perform the tummy tuck in an ambulatory facility as opposed to in his office.  He may also plan a more extensive operation than another surgeon.  So, not all tummy tucks are created equal and it's important to get as much information as possible!

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Negotiate Price

+1

This going to depend solely on the surgeon you are seeing.  You may think he or she should give you a better deal since you have had a number of procedures and referred a number of patients but ultimately it is up to him.

I do not think it is unreasonable to ask and to remind him that you referred several patients and see what the answer is.  It is like wise not unreasonable to get a second opinion.

Good luck and thank you for your question.

Ralph R. Garramone, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.