Why is my Areola So Large?

I'm 14 years old, never pregnant, a virgin, had my period for about 2 years, I'm a 36C. Both of my areoles are very large, about 2 1/2 inches wide. I'm very uncomfortable with my areola. Is there a reason they are like this? Is it normal? Is it cancerous? Is there a possible way that they can go to a normal size? I am extremely insecure about this.

Doctor Answers (3)

Large Areolas a Concern for a 14-Year-Old

+1
Large areolas are a variant of normal anatomy. Because breasts aren't freely visible the way our faces are, girls and women are often unaware that what they think is abnormal is actually normal.

When you're 18 or older, if your large areolas still bother you, you can look for a board-certified plastic surgeon and ask about having a donut mastopexy to reduce the size of your areolas. 

Click on the link below to read more about a donut mastopexy.

All the best.


Santa Rosa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Large Areola

+1

A large areola can easily be reduced.   This is an outpatient procedure, and sometimes done in an office setting.   Since you are very young, discuss this with your parents, and see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon, certified by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) to discuss your concerns and expectations.

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Large areolas

+1

There are many sizes of normal areolas!  Every woman is unique, and some have very small nipples and/or areolas, and some have very large.   If the size bothers you, there is a procedure to reduce the size of the areola.  If you are still growing, you will want to wait until your breasts are done developing before considering surgery.

Michelle Spring, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.