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Can Miradry Be Used to Treat Hyperhidrosis on Body Parts Other Than the Auxiliary Area?

I am suffering from compensatory sweating after going through ETS in 2011. Can Miradry be used to treat hyperhidrosis on body parts other than the auxiliary area? For example, back, thighs, etc. If not now, would it be possible to treat areas aside from the auxiliary area in the future?

Doctor Answers (6)

MiraDry is used for axillary severe sweating

+1

To date, miraDry is FDA-approved for treating excessive sweating in the armpit area only.  The miraDry handpiece is specifically designed to fit against and apply slight suction to the shape of an armpit.  Even if you were to attempt it on the feet, you may not be able to get enough suction to ensure an adequate treatment.  There are also important structures such as tendons, nerves and blood vessels that are closer to the surface of the skin on the palms and soles than in the armpit and could possibly get damaged by performing miraDry there.  Other treatment options available for excessive sweating on the hands and feet include topical medications, oral medications, iontophoresis and Botox injections.


Long Island Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

MiraDry is only for armpits (right now)

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miraDry is only FDA approved for armpit sweating, and we only use it for underarms.  Its safety has not been proven for other parts of the body.  

Areas such as under the breasts or backs of thighs may be approved in the future, but they are not approved yet.  

Hands and feet are more tricky because nerves and arteries run quite close to the surface of the skin.   

Melissa Chiang, MD
Houston Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

MiraDry for compensatory sweating

+1

I perform every procedure for excessive sweating and understand what compensatory sweating is and how frustrating it is to treat this condition. There are anecdotal reports and also off label use of miraDry for parts of the body like the inner thighs, lower back and I have been informed of several other areas by doctors outside of the U.S. that have used it for that purpose. However, in the U.S. it is only FDA approved for the underarms. I don't see why it would be harmful when used in the thighs if the physician understands the anatomy of the vasculature in the lower extremities ... I think it can be very helpful and safe to use in the back (off label use at the discretion of the physician). Be patient, the technology will catch up and in the next several years there are going to be newer types of energy sources for use ... Ultrasound energy as in Ultherapy ... among others.

Hratch Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Buffalo General Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

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MiraDry for hands and feet - Untested

+1

Unfortunately there are no good solutions for sweating of the hands and feet.  MiraDry uses microwave energy to damage the sweat glands by directing the energy beneath the skin.  The hand and feet have too many vital structures in the undersurface of the skin.  The only remedy is botox in the hands/feet, or a surgical sympathectomy.  

Young R. Cho, MD, PhD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Other areas may be possible in the future

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currently the only areas that we treat with miradry is the armpits.  Hands and feet will not be experimented on anytime soon due to the complexity of the many nerves and arteries in these intricate body parts.  However, I do believe that in the near further treatment in other body areas like the thigh and the back may be possible.

Cameron Rokhsar, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Miradry Treatment Locations

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Miradry can only treat the axillary (underarm) areas.  In the future, it may be possible to treat other body parts, but currently, that is the only location.  Our office is located in the Houston Galleria area, and we currently price Miradry at $3000 for 2 treatment sessions of the axillary region.

Syed O. Ali, MD
Houston Dermatologist

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.