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Mild Rosacea - What Should I Do?

I have redness on my nose and cheeks. Its mild. Doctor said I have rosacea, however am not 100% convinced. I apply mupimet cream during day and Retino AC gel at night. I used it for a month and although the redness reduced a bit but no major difference. I never get any pimples. Small boils but thats very rare. Do I have rosacea? What cream should I use? Is finacea good for me? Or the creams given by doctor are correct? Can I use DermaNew acne and oil control/rejuvenation for my skin type?

Doctor Answers (3)

Tough to say from your picture whether you have rosacea...but with

+1

your complexion I wouldn't be surprised if you have either seborrheic dermatitis or atopic dermatitis rather than rosacea...ask your doctor...may be the best treatment for your condition is really a little over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream...try it for about two weeks - maybe three applications each day - then if your better, that's valuable information for your doctor...but this is just from the picture which isn't very specific or clear...
 

Las Vegas Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Mild Rosacea - What Should I Do?

+1

I agree with the other posting here, that if the redness is persistent, you likely have rosacea.  Topical medications which can help improve the redness include metronidazole, sulfacetamide and azelaic acid.  Mupimet is a topical antibiotic, which I doubt will help the rosacea.  The Retin-A gel may actually cause irritation and redness.  Patients with rosacea need to be careful because they tend to have very sensitive skin.  I suggest you see a dermatologist for evaluation.

(This answer is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for medical advice.  It is posted for patients’ general education only.  Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider for further evaluation of your individual case.)

Seattle Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Is mild redness on the face rosacea?

+1

If the redness is persistent, it most likely is rosacea.  Also consider that products like Retin A gel can cause some irritation and result in redness.

Topical medications most often used to treat rosacea are metrogel, sulfur/sulfacetamide combinations like Rosula or Clarifoam (there are many of these combinations on the market) and finacea. 

Short Hills Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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