Fat Necrosis 12 Months Post-op, DCIS Bilateral Mastectomy?

Good day How likely is it for fat necrosis to occur 12 months post op? I had DCIS in left breast, oestrogen +, nodes clean. I opted to have a bilateral mastectomy. Calcifications found in right breast. Reconstruction with silicone implants behind the chest wall12 months ago. I've discovered a lump as big as a pea in my right breast a week ago. Nothing showed up on the sonar although the dr could feel the lump. When I found DCIS lump, Sonar and mammo didn't pick it up either. Thank you

Doctor Answers (3)

Palpable Mass

+1

Given your breast cancer history, if you are feeling a mass, then this warrants medical attention.  Please see your reconstructive plastic surgeon and/or your oncologist for an evaluation.


Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 128 reviews

"Lump" in Breast 1 Year Post Mastectomy with Reconstruction

+1

It is not unusual for the breast to feel lumpy bumpy after mastectomy with subsequent reconstruction.  From what little information you have provided you seem to be a low risk for recurrence. The typical factors that will increase the likelihood of recurrence include: Lymph node involvement, Tumor size larger than 5 centimeters, Inflammatory breast cancer, No radiation therapy after lumpectomy, Women under age 35, and Positive or close margins in the specimen.

However, due to the fact that there is a very discreet mass in a post mastectomy patient, I would be inclined to do an excisional biopsy of the lesion. It would be the safe and easy thing to do.

Good luck.

Pedro M. Soler, Jr., MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Breast reconstruction with expanders and implants

+1

Is this near your mastectomy scar?  Could do an excisional biopsy for definitive diagnosis.

Robert Whitfield, MD, FACS
Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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