Consequences of Not Addressing Extracted Teeth?

The 4 back teeth in the top right side of my mouth will be gone within the next 2 months. I am exploring options and have a couple of questions... 1) These teeth are not visible so what if I do not get implants and just leave the space as is what impact will that have on the structure of my mouth? Perhaps utlizing a press-on veneer. 2) Other than getting implants what are other alternatives?

Doctor Answers (8)

Non Restovative Option

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Not restoring missing teeth may lead to several issue down the road.  If you leave your right side with out upper teeth, you will be force to chew on the left side.  This will cause excessive wear on the left and possibly tooth loss on the left.  If you don't want implants, you only alternative is a partial denture.  It may not be the best thing, but it's better than doing nothing at all.


San Ramon Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon

Replacing Extracted Teeth

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The most obvious and detrimental consequence of not replacing a missing tooth is bone loss. When the teeth are present and in function the bone is maintained .Simiiar to an aging adult that avoids serious osteoporosis through resistance excercise. By not replacing a tooth post extraction the ability to provide a successful denture, bridge , or Implant  is compromised due to a loss of bone.

Dental implants not only aid in the retention of dentures or crowns, but they also promote the maintenance of bone. Placing a Dental Implant after an extraction has numerous benefits. Among them is stimulating the bone so that a defect will not occur.

Bradley J. Daar, DDS
Hartford Cosmetic Dentist

Teeth Should Be Replaced After Extractions to Avoid Certain Consequences

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Even if teeth are not visible, such as is in your case, they should be replaced after being extracted otherwise certain consequences may occur.  Immediately after teeth are extracted, bone begins to resorb or shrink unless the teeth are replaced immediately. The opposing teeth will continue to drift or move until there is an equal and opposing force.  They might even drift and touch the opposing gums where the extracted teeth once were.  Since a large portion of one side will be without teeth contacting, your bite will change possible causing muscle soreness and tension leading to TMD (TemporoMandibular Joint Dysfunction).  This will eventually occur because you will tend to naturally favor the only side that has teeth.  Once this process of drifting and shifting of teeth occur, your front teeth will inevitably have to much stress to bear and will tend to splay or drift forward.  Though I am presenting the worse case scenario, any of the above mentioned consequences can be corrected with replacement teeth.  Your options would be a removable denture or a fixed bridge supported by implants.  In my opinion, your best option would be the implant supported bridge.

Nick M. Mobilia, DDS
New York Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

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Not replacing missing teeth ?

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Number one teeth below will shift and teeth forward will shift this shifting or drifting will cause loss of other teeth... By not replacing teeth the bone in the region will resorb away creating problems down the road. When the jaw bone doesn't not have teeth tissue and bone is lost through atrophy or lack of use. When teeth are not replaced function is compromised and esthestics of the exterior of the face will change good luck

 

Kevin Coughlin DMD, MBA, MAGD    CEO Baystate Dental PC

Kevin Coughlin, DMD
Springfield Cosmetic Dentist

Consequences of NOT Extracting Teeth

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This question cannot be answered without seeing X-rays of your teeth. If the teeth are infected, then the longer they remain in your mouth, the more the infection will grow and spread, destroying more jaw bone along the way.

Jay Neuhaus, DDS
New York Cosmetic Dentist

Consequences

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Doing nothing is always an option when extracting a tooth/teeth.  If you have teeth opposing the ones coming out will be affected if you do nothing though.  What we typically see is the tooth/teeth below begin to errupt more.  Teeth like to continue to errupt until they come to contact with something, if there is nothing to oppose them they will continue until they get loose and need to be removed, or until they touch the gums above them.  I am not sure what you mean by a press on veneer, are you referring to Snap on Smile?  If so, that may be an option if you are looking for a lower cost temporary fix.  Other than an implant to fill the void, your other options may include a fixed dental bridge or a metal framework partial denture.  As far as ease and long term stability, I would recomend going with the implants.  In order to do a bridge you must have teeth on either side of the teeth extracted.  You would then prepare those teeth for a crown in order to attach the bridge.  A partial is a removable appliance, they work well.  The problem a lot of people have with the partial is the fact that they do come in and out, they cover the roof of your mouth a bit (with the upper partial only), and they generally have a clasping mechanism that holds the partial to other teeth in the mouth.  They need periodic adjustment and relines.  Price wise, they will all cost around the same amount, long term - implants tend to be a better option as they do not affect the adjacent teeth.

Don W. Ririe, DDS
Portland Cosmetic Dentist

It will effect your facial structure,chewing and other teeth

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Implants have better longterm success than partial dentures which can be option for you. Facial sagging with limited chewing and esthetics are concerns with no replacement. Adjacent and opposing teeth with shift and can lead to problems which in result in loss of more teeth in quicket time. I will definitely recommend replacement.

Adnan Saleem, DMD
Frisco Cosmetic Dentist

Consequence of Not Replacing Missing Teeth

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If you do not replace those missing teeth, there is a good chance the other teeth will shift and move around, possibly changing your bite and leading to future problems in your mouth.  Further, once those teeth are gone that bone will soon start to resorb.  I would have a plan in action prior to removing the teeth.  Consider getting a CBCT scan to see where your sinus is, discuss bone grafting and implants.  If for whatever reason, dental implants are not an option, the only other option is a removable partial denture.

Frank Orlando, DDS
New York Cosmetic Dentist

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.