Ask a doctor

How Soon After a C-section Can I Have a Tummy Tuck?

I am 46 yrs. old and I have had 4 c-sections and another c-section for a hysterectomy last year in May 2008. Would it be too soon to consider having a tummy tuck and breast augmentation?

Since my last c-section/hysterectomy, I now have this sagging/pouch stomach and I can feel scar tissue inside under the incision and in the lower stomach region. Would this scar tissue also be dealt with a tummy tuck procedure?

Doctor Answers (10)

How Soon After a C-section Can I Have a Tummy Tuck?

+1
My advice would be to wait about 6 months for the scarring from the C-section to completely heal. This also gives time for your body to lose the pregnancy weight. During pregnancy, the body changes a lot and needs time to return to pre-pregnancy state.


Sugar Land Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

How Soon After a C-section Can I Have a Tummy Tuck?

+1
Best to achieve a long-term stable weight prior to proceeding with surgery. It will also likely be in your best interests to have your child a little older,  and more self-sufficient, prior to proceeding. A few words of advice, i provide my patients may be helpful:

1. Make sure you are doing the procedure for the right reasons (for yourself) and that you have realistic expectations. Be aware that an improvement in the “problem area” may not translate to an overall improvement in your life situation. You are bound to be disappointed with results of the procedure if your motivation for doing the surgery is not internally driven.
2. Time your surgery carefully; generally, it is not a good idea to have surgery done during or immediately after a stressful period in life (for example divorce or death of a loved one). The additional stress of surgery will undoubtedly be more challenging to deal with if a patient's emotional reserves our already exhausted. Remember, that an improvement in your physical appearance will not translate to an improvement in your life situation.
3. If possible speak to patients who have undergone similar procedures and query them about the toughest times of their recovery period. Any practical hints previous patients can provide may be very helpful.
4. Make sure you are aware of potential complications that may arise how to reach your surgeon if necessary.

5. Make sure you have a strong and patient support system (several people if possible) in place who have time/patience to take care of you. Arrange for professional nursing if any doubt exists regarding the availability and/or stamina of your caretakers.
6. Be patient with the healing process, understanding that it will take several weeks to months to feel “normal” again. It may also take many months/year to see the end results of your surgery.
7. Be prepared to distract your mind with things of interest such as books, magazines, and movies.
8. Expect less of yourself; do not go back to work, school or chores too early and let others take care of you (for a change).
9. Pick your surgeon carefully (a well experienced board-certified plastic surgeon) and trust in his/her advice. Keep in close communication with your surgeon and do not hesitate to communicate questions/concerns and the emotional swings that you may experience.
10. Resume all medications that you were using preoperatively when cleared by your plastic surgeon and stop the use of narcotics and sedatives as soon as feasible after surgery.
11. Keep in mind the end results as you go through the tougher emotional times after your surgery.

I hope this, and the attached link, helps.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 794 reviews

Tummy Tuck after C-section

+1

I think it is very safe to have a tummy tuck.   Previous gynecologic procedures are common place amongst the tummy tuck patients.   You can expect significant improvement in your abdominal scar tissue after this procedure.   I wish you a safe and healthy recovery.

Paul S. Gill, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 42 reviews

You might also like...

Timing of Tummy Tuck after last C-section?

+1

In summary, you had 5 intra-abdominal operations through the same C-section incision, the last being OVER 2.5 years ago and now you want to have a Tummy Tuck and Breast Augmentation (Mommy Make Over). You are wondering if the timing is safe and if the scar tissue creating the pooch would be dealt with.

In YOUR case, 2.5 years is way more than adequate to go in safely and give you the figure you always wanted. (While every Plastic surgeon has his own criteria, most would agree it would be best to go in when the tummy skin is no longer swollen and inflamed allowing for the maximal removal of excess skin and the easiest operation. That can mean a wait of 4-8 months after the last C-section).

The old C-section scar will be removed along with all the skin below the belly button. Any scar between the lower tummy skin and underlying muscles will be removed at this time.

This is YOUR time. Go for it.

Good Luck.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

How soon after c-section for tummy tuck (abdominoplasty)

+1

This is controversial and while some surgeons may be willing to perform this at the time of c-section, the vast majority, in my opinion would prefer to defer this for a minimum of 4 months following successful healing and cessation of nursing. A tummy tuck is an excellent technique for improving the appearance of a bad c-section scar.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Tummy tuck after h

+1

I would probably have you wait about six months to allow for adequaste healing and for swelling to subside before doing the surgery you vrequested.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

When to have a tummy tuck after a C-section

+1

Tummy tucks are a popular and effective way to recontour the abdomen. These are very commonly done after a woman has had childbirth or a C-section. Pregnancy can change the body and abdomen of a woman and can often separate the two abdominal muscles causing a rectus diastasis.
Once you are done stealing from the C-section and have completed breast-feeding, patients should wait approximately 6 months before considering any abdominal surgery. This will give your body time to heal and allow your abdomen to return to its normal state before receiving its repair.

To learn more about tummy tucks, see photos, and help you decide which one is best for you, please visit us at the link below:

Pat Pazmino, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

How long to wait after C-section for tummy-tuck

+1

Generally, it best to wait 9-12 months after C-section before having a tummy-tuck. You have already waited this long. The scar tissue you feel will be addressed by the procedure. You should also consider as to whether or not you are considering having additional children, as future pregnancy will most likely affect the results.

Tracy Pfeifer, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Now sounds like a good time

+1

If you are in good physical condition and are healthy, you should visit an excellent plastic surgeon who does many tummy tucks and be evaluated.  It will probably be a great option to give you a very nice, flat abdomen and the scar will most likely remove your old scars.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Go ahead!

+1

If you are happy with your current weight and are in good health, then you've waited plenty of time before pursuing surgery. Generally, the tummy tuck incision would be below your c-section scar and would remove it along with all of the scar down to the abdominal muscles. If the muscles have separated with pregnancy, those too can be tightened. Good luck!

Robert S. Houser, DO
Columbus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.