Do Tubular Breasts Heal Differently After Breast Augmentation?

I opted for breast augmentation to correct or at least improve my tubular breasts (with very high breast folds). It's been 2 months and I am not seeing the smooth shape I expected at this stage. I still see a line (where the implant is sitting, I guess) and it totally LOOKS like a boob job.

I wanted to know if I am being realistic with my healing time. Will this crease improve over time? Is there something I can be doing to help the healing along? Will I ever look smooth? Thanks!

Doctor Answers (15)

Tubular breast deformity

+4

Tubular breasts are tough to correct, and the first thing I always tell patients is that their breasts may not ever look completely normal. That being said, it looks like there is still some banding of your breast tissue that could be released. I have seen this happen after tubular breast correction, and it's frustrating for both surgeon and patient. The line you see is the band; the implants are sitting in the correct space. I suggest giving it at least six months prior to any revision surgery, and speaking with your surgeon about this. This is a tough problem, but it looks like you've come a significant part of the way towards correction. Good luck and best wishes, /nsn.


New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Breast implants not enough to correct tubular breasts.

+3

Hi.

1) The thing to understand is that women with tubular breasts really need breast reconstruction, with reshaping and spreading out of the breast tissue itself, by internal incisions. This is the key step to get normal shape, not breast implants. It does not look like you had this done.

2) I am afraid this will not improve on its own. Of course wait another four months at least, but eventually you will need a revision. It may never be perfect, but I think it can be better.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Tubular breasts

+2
It's difficult to answer this question for you as there is a small photo in a limited area with no before image. However, women with tubular / tuberous breasts can achieve excellent results and are some f the happiest patients in my practice as this surgery is life altering for them. 

Michael Law, MD
Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

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Snoopy Dog Breasts

+2

It is obvious from your post op photo that you were born with a tubular breast deformity.  This will not correct on its own and you will need a secondary procedure to improve your shape.  Your original surgery should have included some reshaping (mastopexy) in addition the the augmentation.  You can still obtain a nice result but there will be additional scars around the areola and the cost/inconvience of a secondary procedure.  If your original surgeon willnot/cannot perform the next procedure, maybe there can be some financial reimbursement to help cover the cost of the secondary procedure.

Good Luck,

David R Finkle, MD

David Finkle, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Tuberous/tubular breasts and post operative shape and healing

+2

It may take at least 6 months for the crease in tubular or tuberous breast to resolve or improve after breast augmentation.  I would suggest waiting at least this amount of time before suggesting a revisionary surgery.  If after that period of time the shape has not improved, you could consider a surgery that would involve scoring or releasing the base of the breast to allow it to unfurl, along with a donut shaped skin resection (mastopexy) around the areola (pigmented area around the nipple). 

Vincent D. Lepore, MD
San Jose Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Tubular breast correction

+2

Tubular breast can be pretty difficult to correct. It looks as though there is some banding that has not been completely released. I would wait at least 6 months before you consider any revisionary surgery. This will also give your breast a little more time to heal and settle. Understand though that your breast may never be completely corrected, but improvement is a definite possibility. Definitely go talk to your plastic surgeon about this.

Best Regards,

Dr. Speron

Sam Speron, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon

Tuberous Breast Correction

+1
Tubuerous breasts need more than breast implants to improve their contour.

The goal is to create a more rounded, regular shape and decrease large areola and large nipples, if necessary. Ideal breasts are comprised of evenly distributed tissue while tuberous breasts are characterized by tissue that is concentrated directly underneath the protruding nipples. Because of this, a common treatment technique involves releasing this constricted breast tissue by making internal radial incisions that allow it to splay out properly. These incisions are done internally so the patient doesn't see anything externally. In most cases I will suggest the placement of an implant, typically in the sub-mammary position to better influence the breast’s shape and to add greater volume. If excess or sagging skin is present, surgeons may recommend performing a breast lift as part of the procedure as well. You may need another procedure to address the crease. Please wait about 4 months after surgery to determine this.

Jerome Edelstein, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Tubular breast correction

+1
It looks as though your breasts remain constricted in the lower pole, which creates a line where the constricted breast base meets the implant. This may improve over the next several months as the implant continues to stretch the tissue. However, it may require revisionary surgery to further reshape your native tissue. Fat grafting over the implant to help camouflage the transition may also help. This is a difficult problem and sometimes takes a few surgeries to get a satisfactory result. Best of luck.

Grant Stevens, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Tubular Breast Deformity and Breast Augmentation

+1

         Tubular breast deformity occurs because of constriction of the skin at the base of the breast.  This often results in herniation of the breast tissue through the areola which creates a unique breast shape. The vast majority of constricted breast deformities are relatively mild and treatment may not be necessary.  Severe cases of this condition occasionally occur and do require treatment because of the magnitude of the breast deformity.  A variety of approaches can be used to correct this problem.  Treatment should be individualized, based on the specifics of the anatomic deformity and the aesthetic goals of the patient.

 

 Based on your pictures, it would appear that your breast augmentation surgery was not an adequate treatment for your tubular breast deformity. At this point in time, it’s unlikely that conservative management will address the remaining anatomic defect.  Correction will require release of the constricted inferior portion of the breast and a breast lift. It’s important that you share your concerns with your plastic surgeon, so a treatment plan can be developed.

Richard J. Bruneteau, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 74 reviews

Double bubble after breast augmentation of tuberous breasts happens when lower pole not fully released

+1
Implants alone are seldom the best choice in treating a significant tubular/tuberous deformity as in your case unfortunately demonstrates. I do not think that you will see much change/improvement from your present situation over time.

Since you had a very short nipple to infra mammary fold distance, the lower pole needed to be released completely to create a smooth transition from the breast fold to the prostheses. This can be performed secondarily but for that I would wait 6 months. This should be performed through a periareolar incision. 

The link below is to a breast revision case I recently performed on a young lady who also developed a double-bubble deformity because her surgeon performed a straight-forward breast augmentation (re: did not release the lower pole during surgery) even though her breasts were slightly tuberous.

Hope that helps and good luck going forward,
Dr. Bill DeLuca

William F. DeLuca Jr, MD
Albany Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 109 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.