Bat Wings Arms

Arm Tuck or Arm Lift for loose skin and bat wings?

Doctor Answers (19)

Bat wing treatment

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"Bat wings" vary greatly from patient to patient. In general the excess skin and underlying tissues need to be excised. The larger the wings, the longer the incisions will need to be for optimal results.


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Brachioplasty for Loose Skin & Fat Accumulation In Arms

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A variety of options exist for treating redundant upper arm tissue. These include both arm lift and arm tuck procedures. Each procedure has specific indications and their use is dependent on the anatomic deformity that’s encountered. Without pictures or a physical examination it’s virtually impossible to recommend one over the other.

 

                  Under these circumstances, consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon is appropriate. This surgeon should be able to formulate a treatment plan that’s appropriate for your anatomic deformity.

                  It’s important to understand that these terms may mean different things to different people. For this reason, it’s more important to focus on the anatomic deformity then a poorly defined procedure. 

Richard J. Bruneteau, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 89 reviews

Bat wings treatment

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There are many causes for flabby arms.  If one has flabby arms, the best indicator of the treatment would be the elasticity of the skin.  If the skin has good elasticity, then Lipo suction alone may be the answer.  If not, then an arm lift to resect the excess skin is best.  However, the best indication for an arm lift, and the most gratifying are those who have lost a lot of weight.  The skin is usually flabby and overstretched.  It is simple and effective to remove the skin that has been stretched past its capacity.  No Liposuction, or other noninvasive modalitiy will help the skin become more firm around the arms.  The length and type of the incision will vary depending upon the location and the amount of fat in the arms.  The cost will also vary by geographic locale.  Most will run anywhere from $3500-$7000.  I would advise you to visit with a board certified plastic surgeon to have treatment recommendations specific to your concerns.

Raj S. Ambay, MD
Tampa Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

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Bat wings

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Bat wing arms can be treated by brachioplasty. The degree of scarring will depend on the length of the incision which, in turn, would be based on the location and extent of the hanging skin in the upper arms. This is an excellent procedure but does have the tradeoff of exchanging the sagging skin for some visible scarring.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Arm lifting for bat wings

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The arm lifting procedure is a great procedure to remove excess skin and adipose tissue of the upper arms. However, this procedure carries a major drawback: difficult scarring that may require scar revision (more so, in my experience, then other procedures).

I have tried placement of the resulting scars in the bicipital  groove (between the biceps and triceps muscles)  as well as a long the inferior–lower aspect of the upper arm. I have found higher patient satisfaction with the latter approach. If the excision can be planned such that the scar falls along the frontal aspect of the lower arm, then the scar may be visible only when the patient raises his/her arms.

As with many plastic surgical procedures, the planning of the incisions and resulting scar line is critical. However, even with attention to detail, the resulting scars may not be ideal and revisionary surgery is  often necessary to improve the appearance (for example, the width) of the scars.

Thank you for the question–I hope this helps.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 791 reviews

Bat wings

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A brachioplasty is a great operation to treat bat wings which develop when a patient has very loose arms most commonly after massive weight loss.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Brachioplasty for Excess Skin in Upper Arms

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A brachioplasty is essentially an upper arm lift. In this procedure, the excess hanging skin and fat in the upper arm is removed. Its the procedure used to correct the common "bat wing" of skin that manifests in patients who have lost a significant amount of weight. 

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 128 reviews

Correction of "Bat Wings"

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If the degree of skin laxity extends from the arm pit region down to the elbow, than a brachioplasty or arm lift is required to remove the excess skin. Liposuction is often added to help achieve the best contour. An arm tuck is a confusing term. Patients that have laxity at just the upper part of the arm may benefit from a short scar arm lift (which could also be called and arm tuck). TO see what id the best procedure to meet your goals, find a plastic surgeon with a lot of experience performing these procedures.

Joseph Michaels, MD
Bethesda Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Brachioplasty for bat wings

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If you've got arm laxity extending to your elbow- you need an arm lift. There are a variety of names for this operation. Find a good plastic surgeon to see which variety of brachioplasty is best for you.

Scott C. Sattler, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Arm tuck and arm lift are the same thing

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Some people may use arm tuck to mean a short scar brachioplasty and arm lift to mean a regular brachioplasty.  The length of the scar required really depends on the amount of loose skin and redundant fat you have.  Often times the scar can be kept shorter, but the result is also then less than if a longer scar was acceptable.

Sanjiv Kayastha, MD
Albany Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.