Arm Lift Recovery

I'm thinking about an arm lift and just wondering what to expect. What's the recovery like after the arm lift? What can I expect in terms of downtime and scarring?

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Arm Lift Recovery

This is a very satifying surgery and has a short recovery for the gains you get.  Most of my patients need about 2-3 days of recovery and are back at work as long as it is a desk job at about 3-5 days.

Arm movement at the shoulder is restricted for the first 4 weeks.  After that there are no restrictions.

Good luck.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

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Downtime for armlift

After arm lift surgery, I suggest minimal activity for the first few days. Please avoid lifting for about 2 weeks.  By 4 weeks, most are back to regular activities.  However, I do recommend avoiding all tanning for 3 months.

Connie Hiers, MD
San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Arm Lift Recovery

What I tell my patients always is if you follow the indications properly especially the first week everything should go smoothly from there. The indications I recommend to my patients to follow are , to limit yourself to minimal activities at least for 10 days and no lifting heavy object for a month. As for driving approximately 10 days also. The use of the bandages or garment is very important this is to prevent serious complications like hematomas, seromas inflammatory liquid that could accumulate. Some stitches will be removed in 10 days after the surgery, others are not necessary. The scar tends to diminish in 6 months. I recommend this surgery it has a amazing results and patients leave very satisfied. 

Hope this helps !
Regards 

 

Luis Suarez, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Arm lift recovery expectations

Arm lift procedures should be tailored to your unique needs and desires. Patients with less contour issues may only require liposuction with laser therapy or armpit incisions to reduce skin laxity. The downtime and recovery for those procedures is minimal, most patients are back to work in several days and resume normal activity in 10-14 days. More extensive soft tissue laxity requires a formal brachioplasty, typically with placement of operative drains and minimizing heavy activity for several weeks while the tissue heals. The scar from this procedure usually heals nicely but can be prominent in some individuals. Postoperative scar therapy can help to minimize scar formation. Be sure to discuss your concerns with your board certified plastic surgeon.

Andrew Goldberg, MD
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Recovery of an arm lift (brachioplasty)

The recovery is proportional to the extent of the surgery.  If you have had major weight loss and are having a brachioplasty with an elbow to armpit incision, then you need more time.  In our practice, arm lift surgery is not one that patients qualify as painful, and most patients are off pain medicine within 5 days. The scar is long, and the final result can be somewhat unpredictable. The scar goes from armpit to elbow and we aim to place it in a relatively inconspicuous place.  Most patients feel it is a good trade off to remove all the excess skin, even when the scar is somewhat thick.   How much time off you need depends entirely on your line of work. Consulting in person with a board-certified plastic surgeon with post-weight loss plastic surgery will give you the best answers. 

The link below shows a fully healed brachioplasty (arm lift). 

Heather J. Furnas, MD
Santa Rosa Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Arm lift recovery

Following an arm lift I prefer that patients take it easy for at least one week.  If their job is not very physical, they may resume work even sooner.  I also prefer that patients avoid strenuous exercise for at least one month.  Of course, I encourage patients to work out quite a bit before surgery so they will bounce back quickly following the operation.

David Stoker, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Brachioplasty (arm lift) recovery

The recovery for an arm lift (brachioplasty) is different for each patient.In my practice I tell patients they will be in a compressive dressing for about 2 days.There are dissolvable sutures, but we typically put in a few “anchor” sutures about every 2-3 inches that come out at 10 days.There are steri-strips on the incisions that should not be removed for 5-7 days.We ask patients to avoid heavy lifting for about 10-14 days.After the incision is healed, patients can resume normal activities.It is about 4-6 weeks before patients are feeling 100% “normal” again.

Recovery Time Following Brachioplasty

 

                  Brachioplasty recovery varies from patient to patient and depends on a variety of factors including the type of procedure performed, the patients wound healing characteristics and the patients overall health.

                  The vast majority of patients are able to resume normal activities in 2 to 3 weeks following surgery. Strenuous activity and heavy lifting should be avoided for at least 6 to 8 weeks following this procedure.

                  In the immediate post-operative period drains and compression garments are utilized. Drains are typically removed in about a week, but compression wraps are left in place for about 3 weeks.

                  Wound healing varies from patient to patient and is an important issue because incision sites are hard to hide with this procedure. Under these circumstances the wound healing characteristics of the patient are extremely important because scars are often visible following surgery. For this reason, wound care is extremely important following brachioplasty surgery. If you’re considering brachioplasty, it’s important to discuss after care with your plastic surgeon before proceeding with surgery. 

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.