Alarplasty Recovery

How long does it take for the skin to recovery after alarplasty? How long does it take for the redness to fade away? How big will the scar be? How long can i gain back my smile? How often will there be brusing in such surgery? Is it a must to have a debramasion after the surgery? Thanks.

Doctor Answers (6)

Alarplasty recovery and what to expect

+1

 

It usually takes a couple of months for the alarplasty incision to heal and go through the full healing process.  The amount of time it takes to heal depends upon the type of skin that is present.  Darker skin tends to take longer to heal, but usually within a couple of months those incision sites are well camouflaged.  It takes approximately six weeks for the smile to return once the swelling subsides.  There is usually no bruising with this type of surgery since it is a very small incision at the base of the nostril.  Need for dermabrasion after this type of surgery is infrequent.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Alarplasty

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Alarplasty usually entails some sort of tissue excision along the base of the nose. The incisions usually heal very well but there may be redness and swelling for several months.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Alar or Nostril Reduction

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The healing time is limited from this procedure. Some variants of alar reduction can be healed in as little as a few days. Others, which involve incisions going into the outside of the nostril can be more like 7-10 days. Sutures are removed in 5-7 days in most cases as well.

Patients with very wide nostrils usually need the incision that goes into the outer crease of the nostril. However, I usually try to avoid it, since it can be visible, despite good surgical closure and aftercare.

I typically do not do this procedure in isolation unless it is as an adjunct to a previously performed Rhinoplasty. It usually would not be in balance unless the tip and upper part of the nose is narrowed as well. However, there are always exceptions.

Best of luck

Richard W. Westreich, MD
Manhattan Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Recovery From Alarplasty

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Hi Brian,

In general, an alarplasty heals within one week. Stiches are removed day 5 to 7, the wound then heals. Redness fading varies from patient to patient, usually a few weeks. The scar is usually hidden in the nasal-alar crease and nostril floor, about 1 -2 cm. The return of your smile depends upon how happy or dissatified you are with your new nose. Patients are encouraged not to stretch the skin around the incisions (smiling) for a week. There should not be much if any bruising. Dermabrasion, but more commonly today laser skin resurfacing may be used to help minimize the appearance of the scar.

Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Alarplasty is a relatively simple procedure

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Alarplasty can be done under local anesthesia and recovery is pretty quick. Most surgeons will leave sutures in for about a week after the procedure. After that, the incision can look a little pink but fades pretty quickly over a few weeks. You'll feel a little tight and puffy in the area for a few weeks as well but your smile should not be distorted. There really should not be any bruising. If the incisions are correctly placed near the alar crease, they invariably heal beautifully and almost invisibly. In our experience, we have not found it necessary to dermabrade the incisions.

Best of luck to you.

Jason Litner, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Recovery after Alarplasty

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Brian: Alarplasty is a very generic term. I can think of many different reasons for alarplasty and many more techniques used in alarplasty surgery. I will not even attempt to answer your question. Please submit moe details re what you're considering.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.