Is It Safe to Get Restylane While Breast Feeding?

Doctor Answers (10)

Restylane - safety while breast feeding

+2

Logic seems to suggest that even if miniscule amounts of restylane were to reach the breast milk, it would be unlikely to harm the breast-feeding baby. There are no studies to help guide this decision, and I doubt that a study will ever be conducted to address this question. Receive restylane injections at your own risk while breast feeding (albeit, probably a very small one).

Good luck.


San Diego Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Restylane while breast feeding

+2

When it comes to such discussion we need to discuss it legally, scientifically, and logically. These are not always in agreement.

LEGALLY - It is THE official stance of Medicis, the producer of Restylane and Perlane that the safety of Restylane and Perlane for use during pregnancy, in breastfeeding females or in patients under 18 years has not been established.
You may find out more about this at www.restylaneusa.com where you will find links to both the Restylane and Perlane Package Labeling.

SCIENTIFICALLY - as above. Not enough studies to prove it one way or another.

Logically - Hyaluronic acid is a sugar naturally found in our joints and eye ball. When injected it stays put and attracts water. There is no LOGICAL reason why it would hurt anything. BUT...the company producing it will not stick its neck out and tell you to use it without abundant research nor would any doctor for fear that were anything to happen, despite the logic, he/she would expose themselves to a lawsuit.

So, judge for yourself.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Breast feeding and any elective procedures always carry some potential risk

+2

Breast feeding and any elective procedures always carry some potential risk. While there are no reports of Restylane entering the blood stream and potentially breast milk, if you were dead set on getting the filler, then I would pump several bottles first and wait about 12 hours or so to make sure that there is no lingering effects from the injection. Ultimately, it is probably best to wait until breast feeding is finished for your child.

Scott Trimas, MD
Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Restylane and breast feeding

+2

Dear Roccoreno

Breast feeding should not be a contra indication to Restylane injections as the molecules don't travel in your body and remain fixed at site of injection. At the same time, studies have not and probably will not be conducted to test out safety. In short, nobody knows if there is a true risk. I would tell my patients there is no contra indication but it has not been studied.

Good luck!

Ran Y. Rubinstein, MD
Manhattan Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 121 reviews

Breast feeding and fillers

+2

Since I do not think there are any studies reporting on this, I do not think anyone can give you the correct answer. The likelihood it would be harmful is probably very low, but I would refrain from dong so until you complete breast feeding.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Is it Safe to Get Restylane Injections While Breast Feeding? Yes, Just Not in the Nipples.

+2

Hi Roccoreno,

It should be safe to receive Restylane injections while breast feeding, just avoid the currently popular area that exotic dancers request to have injected to increase their "tips", the nipples. What is the worst thing that will happen; your child will have slightly more pouty lips?

All kidding aside, I would inject my breast feeding wife without any worries, but in this wonderful litigious world of ours, you will be very hard pressed to find a legitimate physician willing to take the chance of injecting you.

You would either have to sign a very informed consent prior to the injections, or wait until you finish breast feeding.

Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Most likely safe to get Restylane while breastfeeding, but totally not advisable

+2

Dear Roccoreno,

Restylane is made from a naturally occuring sugar gel. It appears to be very safe. However, it's safety is untested in nursing mothers. I do not foresee it ever being tested in nursing mothers. If you were treated, could it cause a problem for your baby? Most likely not. However, why would you even take this small risk?

Ethical physicians recommend waiting until your baby is weened before having cosmetic services. To read more about treatments for moms on my blog-just click on the link below.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Restylane while Breast Feeding

+2

There is no answer for this questions. Looking at it scientifically, Restylane contains HA which is a normal molecule in your skin anyway. However, there are no studies saying one way or the other. In my view, why take any chance. Just wait until you are done breast feeding. Good luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Restylane and breast feeding

+2

Nobody can give you a straight answer on this because I doubt any studies have been done on Restylane and breast feeding. You might call the company and ask them.

Personally, I would not recommend doing this becasue of the concern of micro-transmission of foreign material in the milk. Not that this would ever happen, but you wouldn't want to worry.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Restylane While Breastfeeding?

+1

Hi roccoreno.  While there are no studies to indicate that it would be harmful to your baby to get Restylane injections while breastfeeding, most experienced practitioners will not provide cosmetic treatments during this time for liability reasons.  We ask our patents to come back when they are done breastfeeding.

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.