Ask a doctor

Is 60 Too Old for Liposuction?

I am 60 years old. Am I too old for liposuction? I have a "Large" spare tire and drooping belly. Is the skin too old to contract?

Doctor Answers (13)

Very much depends on if you are an old 60 or a young 60

+2

The answer to this very much depends on your overall health.  If you are in good health, active, with few medical issues, you are likely to be fine.  However, what you really need is a liposuction surgeon to assess your issues and determine what you need.

At age 60 you are not likely to have the skin contraction that we expect with a thirty year old.  Do you need an abdominoplasty or a tummy tuck?  Possibly.  However, I would encourage you to start with a cosmetic dermatologists who performs tumescent liposuction.  This is a liposuction that is performed under local anesthetic.  It is the safest form of liposuction-much safer than liposuction under general anesthesia.  However, the degree of skin tightening may not be as dramatic as you are looking for.  On the under hand, the procedure is much easier to recover from than having a body wall resection.  

Yet you might be quite happy with the improvement and you avoid a major surgery.  After you heal, if you decide you want more done, you retain the option to have the bigger surgery.  General plastic surgeons like to perform liposuction under general anesthesia.  Study Jeff Klein's website to learn more about tumescent liposuction so you understand what is possible with this method.  He invented tumescent liposuction.


Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Is 60yo too old for liposuction?

+1
Hello! Thank you for your question! Age alone is not a contraindication to a surgical procedure. There are a few medical comorbidities that contribute to a higher risk during any surgical procedure including infections, wound complications, delayed wound healing, bleeding, anesthetic risks, etc. Factors such as diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart problems, lung problems, etc are more common in the elderly. However, if you are healthy, or these conditions are well-controlled, you would certainly still be a candidate for a surgical procedure. If your complaints or desires are great enough to consider the surgical option, I would seek a consultation with a plastic surgeon to discuss your complaints and go over the options as well as risks and benefits of the procedure.

You should obtain medical clearance from your primary care physician that you are at an acceptable risk for undergoing a surgical procedure. For elective or aesthetic procedures, your surgeon may want to get you to a reasonable health status prior to consideration for a procedure. Discuss all of your medical comorbidities and medication with your surgeon prior and discuss these risks. Also, discuss this with your anesthesiologist as proper monitoring and medications will be watched closely. This procedure should still be very safe for you and hope for an uncomplicated course with an excellent result! Hope that this helps! Best wishes!

Lewis Albert Andres, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Too old for tummy tuck?

+1
Thank you for your post. Age is not a contraindication to surgery. Poor health is. If you are a healthy adult, and interested in a surgery, meet with a board certified plastic surgeon. He or she will assess you as a patient for any risks you might have. The biggest risks are heart disease, diabetes, smoking, high blood pressure, and previous history of deep venous thrombosis. However, I do not think you are a good candidate for liposuction to the belly area, as this will cause more loose skin and will not be a very good cosmetic outcome. I wound consider a tummy tuck instead.
Best Wishes,
Pablo Prichard, MD

Pablo Prichard, MD
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

You might also like...

60 is not too old for liposuction

+1

Your skin elasticity in the hip area (i.e. spare tire) will most likely respond satisfactorily to liposuction. The chances of improvement over the abdominal area are less and really depend on your individual skin elasticity. This would have to be determined by an in-person consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon who could make suggestions after considering your anatomy and goals.

Deason Dunagan, MD
Huntsville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

60 is not too old for liposuction

+1

Your chronologic age is not as important as the skin's properties. Some patients have much better elasticity than younger patients. If you need an abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) than you may benefit by having both (not necessarily at the same time) or in some cases, only an abdominoplasty.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Too old for lipo

+1

From your description, you need a tummy tuck as lipo will not work for droopy tummies with spare tires, even if you are 30.  The skin needs to contract and shrink and won't in most 60 year olds sepecially with the exces you describe.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Liposuction at 60

+1

To evaluate your specific concerns and anatomical parameters, you should visit with an experienced surgeon, usually a board certified plastic surgeon.  This surgeon should have experience in inpatient and outpatient liposuction, including tumescent liposuction (and most plastic surgeons are quite adept at this), and even laser liposculpture.  But you also want a surgeon who has experience in various forms of abdominoplasty.  Do not set yourself up for disappointment and multiple procedures.  A good plastic surgeon will tell you, after consulting with you about your goals and desires, what to expect from the various procedures.  He will tell you the limtations and risks of each.  A physician who only does tumescent liposculpture is only going to offer this, but a physician who has experience in multiple alternatives can offer you the best one that fits you. Discuss the limitations with your physician, because I find in many cases that patients who do not want to undergo a more extensive or invasive procedure are happy with improvement, with less down time, even if it is not the "ultimate" improvement.

Theodore Katz, MD, FACS
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

60 not too old for liposuction

+1

NO! I have done patients in their seventies. Go discuss this issue with a boarded plastic surgeon. I would not expect the results to make you look like 20 years old but there can be an improvement.

From MIAMI Dr. B

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Age limit for Liposuction

+1

There is no real age limit for liposuction as long as you are in good health. Some of my happiest patients have been older than you. You do, however, have to understand the limitations of liposuction. As skin ages, it contracts less after any excess fat is removed. Therefore, two people of different ages with the same problem may get different results.

To achieve the same result, we may have to tighten the skin on an older individual, whereas liposuction alone may be adequate in a younger person. What you describe as “a large spare tire and drooping belly” indicates that you have a significant amount of excess skin. This is most likely too much excess skin for even a young person. Therefore, you will probably need an abdominoplasty to remove this excess skin. We frequently do liposuction with this to blend everything together.
 

Robert T. Buchanan, MD
Highlands Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Liposuction is safe in 60 year old patient.

+1

Hi.

You have to be in good health and your anatomy has to be good for liposuction.  If you have too much drroping skin, you may need a tummy tuck.  This is also safe with good technique and proper precautions.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.